Wednesday, January 20, 2010

Southern Beef and Sausage Goulash

An American goulash, made with ground beef, Italian sausage and andouille, tomato, garlic and pasta, and seasoned with the Trinity and a bit of Cajun seasoning.

Southern Beef and Sausage Goulash

Don't you just love goulash? Now, of course, I'm talking about what we Americans refer to as goulash here, and not anything remotely resembling an authentic Hungarian goulash. Pasta, ground beef, Italian sausage, tomato, a bit of garlic, and in this case, The Trinity, a bit of Cajun seasoning, and some mild andouille sausage to southernize it just a tad, making it even better. Total comfort food, and ... it's all stovetop! So it's a quick & easy meal that is delicious. If you're looking for a very basic American goulash I've got that too! Click that link and we'll carry you right there!

Recipe: Southern Beef and Sausage Goulash

©From the Kitchen of Deep South Dish
Prep time: 15 min |Cook time: 35 min | Yield: About 4 to 6 servings

Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons of olive oil
  • 1/2 cup of chopped celery
  • 1/2 cup of chopped green bell pepper
  • 1/2 of a large onion, chopped
  • 1 pound of ground beef
  • 1/2 pound of Italian sausage
  • 1/4 pound of andouille sausage, chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon Italian seasoning
  • 2 large pinches of kosher salt
  • 8 turns of the pepper grinder
  • 1/2 teaspoon of Cajun seasoning (like Slap Ya Mama)
  • 1 (8 ounce) can of tomato sauce
  • 1 can of Rotel diced tomatoes
  • 1 (14.5 ounce) can of stewed tomatoes
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 tablespoon of dried parsley
  • 2 cups of beef broth
  • 2 cups of uncooked, elbow macaroni noodles
Instructions

Heat oil in a large pot over medium heat; saute the celery, green pepper and onion until softened. Add the ground beef and Italian sausage, cooking over medium high heat, until lightly browned and cooked through, breaking up the meat as it cooks. Add the andouille sausage and the garlic, stir and cook another 3 minutes. Add the Italian seasoning, salt, pepper, and Cajun seasoning, stir and cook another minute.

Stir in the tomato sauce, diced tomatoes, stewed tomatoes, bay leaves and parsley, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer uncovered for 15 minutes. Add the beef broth and pasta, bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover and simmer for 20 minutes or until noodles are tender and liquids have reduced. Taste, adjust seasonings as needed, remove and discard bay leaves, and serve with a nice side salad and a green veggie.

Cook's Notes: Andouille sausage is a highly spiced smoked sausage that is blended with Cajun spices, adding a spicy kick and great flavor to these dishes. If you substitute kielbasa or other smoked sausages in recipes where it calls for Andouille, it will affect the outcome of your dish and you’ll need to make adjustments in the seasonings you use. A side of this fantastic Cheesy Garlic Bread wouldn't hurt either. Oh my gosh is that stuff to die for!

Source: http://deepsouthdish.com

Requires Adobe Reader - download it free!
©Deep South Dish
Are you on Facebook? If you haven't already, come and join the party! We have a lot of fun & there's always room for one more at the table.

Check These Recipes Out Too!

Basic American Goulash
Southernized Baked Ziti
Hamburger Steak with Creamy Onion Gravy
Salisbury Steak with Mushroom Gravy
Posted by on January 20, 2010

Images and Full Post Content including Recipe ©Deep South Dish. Recipes are offered for your own personal use only and while pinning and sharing links is welcomed and encouraged, please do not copy and paste to repost or republish elsewhere such as other Facebook pages, blogs, websites, or forums without explicit prior permission. All rights reserved.

Material Disclosure: Unless otherwise noted, you should assume that post links to the providers of goods and services mentioned, establish an affiliate relationship and/or other material connection and that I may be compensated when you purchase from a provider. You are never under any obligation to purchase anything when using my recipes and you should always perform due diligence before buying goods or services from anyone via the Internet or offline.
.

Bookmark and Share

37 comments:

  1. I love southern style food. I will have to try this for sure.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Oh yummy, I love goulash! Perfect dish for when you worked overtime and the kids are starving. Of course yours would be 'southernized', and boy does it looks great. Can't wait for your Deep South cookbook review.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Looks like a perfect meal for a cold winter day!

    Julie
    www.ridingaside.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  4. Ahhh! This is making me so hungry! Certainly comfort food at its finest! Going to see if I can round up the ingredients for this tonight.

    ReplyDelete
  5. My sister and I were just talking about goulash the other day. Everyone has a different "definition" of goulash. It can be ANYTHING! However, you would think that since we grew up in the same house, we would both identify it similarly. But we don't. We have VERY different ideas of what goulash is!

    ReplyDelete
  6. I grew up on this stuff always made with hamburger meat. Sausage seams like such an improvement even boudan with it's game and rice. But we alwys had corn bread on the side. I'll never forget good ole goulash.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Gorgeous comfort food! I love the recipe and great shot. Makes the chili mac I made last week look kinda pitiful:)

    ReplyDelete
  8. I love any goulash. This sounds so good.

    ReplyDelete
  9. i do indeed love goulash...

    All that ... STUFF, yum

    ReplyDelete
  10. This and the garlic bread you linked too sound so fantastic!

    ReplyDelete
  11. It is 8:30 am, I am having coffee, and would just love a bowl of this
    goulash..what is not to love about the andoulle (sp) sausage? This is looking real good...

    is there anything better than comfort food? besided desert?

    ReplyDelete
  12. Wow Mary, this recipe is awesome...love it.

    ReplyDelete
  13. That looks amazing! I am going to make this next week. I wish I had some today for lunch.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Why have I never thought of putting sausage in my goulash? Genius!

    ReplyDelete
  15. I love this dish, but it's been awhile - your's looks delicious and I must have it soon.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Yes I do love a good Goulash, esp in this cold wet weather we are having. I have got to make this soon!

    ReplyDelete
  17. Cooking up a nice pot of your Southern Ground Beef and Sausage Goulash with some cheese toast and as one of my old coaches would have said,"Mighty fine. Mighty fine."

    ReplyDelete
  18. Ok, I think everytime I make something of yours I have to leave a comment! LOL! I JUST made this and it looks and smells AMAZING!!!!! I used wagon wheel pasta instead of elbow so that my 2year old son would eat it. but I had a question for you....was I supposed to drain my tomato products? I went ahead and drained them and it looks just fine. Anyhow, I know this is gonna be great! Oh and I made the cheesy garlic bread too....we had a whole loaf of French bread on hand..go figure! Well as always, thanks for sharing all your recipes. They are great!!

    ReplyDelete
  19. Thanks Tiffny - it's undrained but it's really not that much liquid so I'm sure that it will be fine - just less juicy LOL! Enjoy!!

    ReplyDelete
  20. This looks so good. I am a one person household and shy away from dishes with the pasta already in it. I am afraid the pasta will continue to absurd the liquid being stored. That said, how does this do as a leftover. I may try to make it up to the add the pasta point and freeze half and finish up half. Hmmmmmm........

    ReplyDelete
  21. Hi Karen! Yes, most of the recipes you find here will be for an average family, but my husband and I eat and reheat leftovers of these recipes ourselves! On the bigger yield recipes like soup & jambalaya, I very often freeze leftovers myself. I do know what you mean about pasta absorbing the liquid, which is the very reason why I do my pasta separate with soups.

    This is more of a pasta skillet meal though, so the intention is actually for the pasta to absorb the sauce, kinda of like a homemade hamburger helper so to speak. I see no reason you couldn't separate the process if you prefer though. Just boil the pasta separately and stir the meat sauce and pasta together in the end and then, you can freeze the meat sauce leftovers alone, and make fresh pasta when you thaw.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Thanks Mary! I wanted to cook the pasta in the sauce. Just thought I might stop right before the pasta and freeze half mthat way, I could add half the pasta and broth and have a smaller quantity And enough for a second, add the pasta and broth. :).

    ReplyDelete
  23. Thanks Mary. I did plan to Cooke the pasta in the sauce, just do half. I figured I could put half the sauce in the freezer and be able to add pasta and broth once it is thawed. I may try it and report back.

    ReplyDelete
  24. You're welcome & yes, please do let me know!

    ReplyDelete
  25. Made this last night and it was really good! Left out the andouille sausage though - not too familiar with that yet, and they didn't have it where I did my shopping yesterday. Thanks for another great recipe!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Andouille is a spicy Cajun style version of smoked sausage. Adds a bit of heat to the dish. You could also sub in regular smoked sausage. Glad y'all enjoyed it Val - thanks so much for stopping back by to let me know!

      Delete
  26. Hi Mary, I'm making this dish for the first time tonight, actually it's the first dish that I will be making from your site. I just came across your site last night while trying to find a recipe for collard greens and ham hocks to go with some fried chicken that my wife was making me for my birthday. But I was wondering if that was 2 cups of mac using a dry measuring cup or liquid measuring cup cause there is a difference in size. This is my new favorite food site because you have all the yummy stuff that I like eating being a boy from Oklahoma. Thanks and God bless.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much James & I hope that you come back to visit often! I usually grab whatever is closest I suppose, but I think that any difference between the two measures is really negligible enough that it doesn't make a difference in a pasta dish like this.

      Delete
  27. This turned out so delicious. thanks for sharing your recipe. I make this all the time but who would have that that a few extra spices and etc. would really knock your sock off. Thanks again.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're very welcome & thank you Morchella for letting me know that y'all enjoyed it! Sometimes folks look at a list of ingredients and get turned off by the number & pass on by, not taking into account that they are mostly just basic seasonings! Just those few little touches can make a huge difference in flavor.

      Delete
  28. Hi Mary, just wanted to tell you how good this recipe is, have made it twice now, it has a good flavor to it. I substituted a one lb. pkg. of Johnsonville Italian sausage in the casings for the sausage in the recipe, took the sausage out of the casings, and cooked it along with the hamburger, the sausage adds a good spice flavor to it. Your recipe site is fantastic for good recipes, thank you for the recipes.

    ReplyDelete
  29. Made this for dinner tonight. And then won tons of love from the FAM. Awesome dish!!!

    ReplyDelete
  30. My mother-in-law made this without sausage but with ground beef. She called it Slumgullion.

    ReplyDelete
  31. this looks so good, thanks for sharing this recipe...

    Simon

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for taking the time to comment - I love hearing from readers and I read every single comment and try to respond to them right here on the site, so stop back by!

From time to time, anonymous restrictions and/or comment moderation may be activated due to comment spam. I also reserve the right to edit, delete or otherwise exercise total editorial discretion over any comments left on this blog.

 
Related Posts with Thumbnails