Thursday, February 25, 2021

Couche Couche - Cajun Breakfast Cereal

This Cajun Breakfast Cereal, known as Couche Couche, Cush Cush or Coush Coush, is made from a cornbread batter, poured into a hot, cast iron skillet, crusted and turned several times, then covered and steam cooked to finish and served with milk or cream.
This Cajun Breakfast Cereal, known as Couche Couche, Cush Cush or Coush Coush, is made from a cornbread batter, poured into a hot, cast iron skillet, crusted and turned several times, then covered and steam cooked to finish and served with milk or cream.

Couche Couche

Unless you live down in this part of the Deep South, you've probably never heard of this dish. Often referred to as a Cajun breakfast, cornmeal cereal, though it's enjoyed just about any time of the day. It comes under a few different names, including  Cush Cush, Couche Couche or Coush Coush, all pronounced "coosh-coosh."

Although some folks will want to compare this to a cornmeal mush, it's actually quite different.

Now I'm not an expert, because mush isn't exactly a Deep South thing, but from my understanding, mush is made with cornmeal, prepped much like we prepare grits, in boiling water, a 4:1 ratio of water to cornmeal being common.

Heat is reduced and the cornmeal is left to simmer for up to about 30 minutes, and then eaten as either a hot cereal, or, it seems, more often, the cooked meal is then poured into a pan, refrigerated until firm, then sliced and pan fried.

According to a Mennonite cookbook I have, scrapple can apparently be made from cornmeal mush, by adding about a pound of "pork pudding meat" (whatever that is) while cooking, then place into a pan, refrigerate and once firm, slice and pan fry.

If you've ever seen your grandparents eating cornbread crumblings in buttermilk, you may be want to compare that to this, but it too is a totally different thing, although crumblings can be made using leftover couche couche!


Couche Couche may be eaten as a sweet cereal, sprinkled with granulated sugar or drizzled with cane syrup, fruit jams or syrups, or more on the savory side with crumbled bacon, fried andouille or smoked sausage or fried cracklings. Either way a drizzle of milk or cream is usually the finish.

Curious enough to give it a try? 

As always, full recipe text with measurements and instructions, as well as a printable document, are a little bit further down the page. Just swipe or scroll past the step-by-step pictures below.

Here's how to make Couche Couche.


Yummy!


For more of my favorite breakfast recipes, check out the collection on my Pinterest page!
Couche Couche - Cajun Breakfast Cereal

Couche Couche - Cajun Breakfast Cereal

Yield: About 4 to 6 servings
Author: Deep South Dish
Prep time: 5 MinCook time: 20 MinTotal time: 25 Min
This cornmeal cereal, known as a Cajun breakfast, is made from a cornbread batter, poured into a hot, cast iron skillet, crusted and turned several times, then steam cooked. It's known as Couche Couche, Cush Cush and Coush Coush, all pronounced "coosh-coosh" and is a Deep South favorite.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup cooking oil (vegetable, canola)
  • 2 tablespoons butter or bacon drippings
  • 2 cups all-purpose cornmeal
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon granulated sugar, optional
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1-1/2 cups milk, plus additional milk, buttermilk or heavy cream for individual servings

Instructions

  1. Heat oil with butter in a 12-inch cast iron skillet over medium-high heat.
  2. Whisk together the dry ingredients; add the milk. Pour batter into the hot oil and allow to cook until a crust forms on the bottom, 8 to 10 minutes. 
  3. Using a metal spatula or spoon, begin turning batter over as it cooks, so the browned part is on top. Once all has been turned, reduce heat to medium low, cover and allow to continue crusting on the bottom and steaming, turning occasionally, until cooked through and has the appearance of cooked, crumbled cornbread. 
  4. Serve as you would with cereal, spooned into individual bowls, sprinkled with sugar or topped with butter and drizzled with cane syrup or honey. Pour milk, cream, buttermilk or hot coffee milk, around the cereal.

Notes:

May be seasoned with salt and pepper only for a more savory version. I also like to cook bacon as a side and serve the couche couche with crumbled bacon and a fried egg on top. 

Other Add-ins/Toppings: Crushed pork cracklings, chopped bacon, chopped sautéed smoked sausage/andouille, fresh fruit or fruit jams and preserves.

Berry Syrup: Heat 1 cup berries with 1 cup syrup in saucepan until berries break down and thickened. Puree and drizzle over the couche couche along with cream.


Breakfast,Cornmeal,Bread,Southern Favorites,Brunch,Lunch,Dinner,Snacks,Cornbread
Breakfast, Brunch, Lunch, Dinner
Cajun, American
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