Saturday, December 15, 2012

Tiger Butter Bark

One of the easiest candies to make, this Tiger Butter Bark is made using almond bark candy coating mixed with peanut butter, topped with chopped peanuts and melted semi-sweet chocolate chips.

Tiger Butter Bark

Even if you think you can't make candy, bark candy is probably one of the easiest and most versatile candies there is. It's always a nice addition to a holiday sweets tray but even better received as a gift. Add in some of those sugared nuts with your gift bag and you've got a great sweet and salty combo!

The basic recipe for Tiger Butter is simply a thin layer of melted white chocolate or the lesser expensive vanilla almond bark, mixed with peanut butter and poured into a jelly roll pan, over which melted semi-sweet chocolate chips are poured and then swirled into the almond bark layer.

Named due to the resemblance of those swirls to tiger fur in appearance, and because the almond candy, combined with peanut butter, gives it a soft, creamy and buttery texture, that separates it from its more firm all-chocolate bark cousins. It's been around for a long time, is a popular candy around Christmas, but has even become a favored tailgate snack adopted by LSU Tiger fans too!

I'm making it here on a large jellyroll pan as a thin bark, but Tiger Butter can also be made in smaller pans for a candy that is thicker and more fudge-like. Just adjust your pan size for the thickness you want.

Here's how to make it.

Mold aluminum foil around an 18 x 13 inch baker's half sheet pan and lightly butter; set aside. Melt the almond bark according to package directions, remove stir well and add the peanut butter. You can use either creamy or chunky peanut butter, but our household preference is creamy peanut butter so that's what I always have on hand. Return to the microwave if needed a few more seconds, or until peanut butter is melted and blended in.


For those of you who don't know, almond bark is a vanilla flavored candy coating made with vegetable fats that you'll find on the baking aisle in your store, usually right around the packaged chocolate. It actually contains no almonds.


Pour the melted almond bark into the prepared pan and use a spatula to evenly spread.


Since I don't use chunky peanut butter, I do like to add some finely chopped, fresh dry roasted peanuts to the top of the melted candy bark and peanut butter, because I always have some of those in the freezer. Just scatter the chopped peanut all over on top.


Add the chocolate chips and evaporated milk to another microwave safe container and melt according to package directions. Blend well and pour randomly over the top of the white bark and nuts.


Use a spatula or a knife to randomly swirl through the chocolate and set aside to cool.


To set faster, allow the tray to cool, then transfer to the refrigerator to quick set at least an hour, longer if you have the time. Break bark into pieces for serving.


Tiger Butter Bark can be stored at room temperature or refrigerated for a firmer bite and longer shelf life. I prefer to keep mine refrigerated and bring out just enough to replenish the sweets tray.

Recipe: Tiger Butter Bark

©From the Kitchen of Deep South Dish
Prep time: 15 min |Inactive time: 1 hour | Yield: About 4 quarts

Ingredients
  • 1 teaspoon of butter
  • 1 (24 ounce) package of white almond bark
  • 2/3 cup of creamy peanut butter
  • 2/3 cup of dry roasted peanuts, chopped
  • 1 cup of semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons of evaporated milk or half and half
Mold aluminum foil around an 18 x 13 inch baker's half sheet pan and lightly butter; set aside. Melt the almond bark according to package directions, remove, stir well and add the peanut butter. Return to the microwave a few more seconds until peanut butter is melted and blended in. Pour into the prepared pan and use a spatula to evenly spread. Scatter the chopped peanut on top.

Add the chocolate chips and evaporated milk to another microwave safe container and melt according to package directions; blend well and pour randomly over the top of the white bark and nuts. Use a spatula or a knife to randomly swirl through the chocolate and set aside to cool. To set faster, allow the tray to cool, then transfer to the refrigerator for an hour or longer to quick set.

Cut into squares, or break bark into pieces for serving. The number of pieces you end up with depends on how you cut or break them, but I can fill about a 4 quart container with broken pieces.

Cook's Notes: May also pour into a smaller pan for a more fudge-like treat and may also be halved successfully. White chocolate or chips may be substituted for the almond bark and you may also use a milk chocolate for the semi-sweet. Drizzle a little bit of caramel sauce over the chocolate before you swirl it in. I prefer to break this up and keep it refrigerated in an airtight container to extend shelf life, bringing out only enough to add to the sweets tray. Tiger Butter may also be stored in a tightly covered container at room temperature, where it will retain a creamy, buttery texture for 2 weeks.

Source: http://deepsouthdish.com

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Posted by on December 15, 2012
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