Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Winter Peach Cobbler

Winter Peach Cobbler, made with canned peaches and a sugar and flour crumble.

Winter Peach Cobbler

When I went to make some spiced peach halves recently, I accidentally opened a large can of sliced peaches, so I thought it would be a great time to put up this version of peach cobbler. As if any Southerner would need an excuse for a comforting pan of warm peach cobbler, slap in the middle of winter, right?

I call this a winter cobbler because it's intended to be made when peaches are out of season, though I see no problem with using canned peaches or frozen peaches any time of the year frankly. It is especially excellent when made with peaches you've home canned yourself, though store bought canned peaches are delicious too.

As written, this will give you about 4 nice servings, but I do highly recommend if there are any more of you to serve, go ahead and double it for a 9 x 13 inch casserole dish. Personally I would have a difficult time not eating that entire pan myself to be honest. I love a good cobbler made from fresh peaches, but I sure do enjoy this version too.


Here's how to make it.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Butter an 8 x 8 inch baking dish; set aside. Whisk together the cup of self rising flour with 1/2 cup of sugar and a pinch of salt. Add 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) of butter that has been melted. You'll need a full stick of melted butter for the entire recipe, but you'll use half here and half on top, so I find it easier to melt it separately, rather than trying to eyeball half of a full stick of melted butter.


Using a fork, mix together until crumbs form.


Sprinkle about 1/3 of the crumb mixture into the bottom of the prepared baking dish. I use a large can of peaches canned in heavy syrup. Evenly distribute the peaches in the baking dish and pour all of the syrup from the can on top. If the juices do not nearly cover the peaches add just a bit of additional water to cover or the cobbler will be dry. If you use a light canned peach or unsweetened frozen peaches, please understand that will affect the sweetness of the cobbler overall, so if you're trying to cut back on sugar, you may need to make this one time and then judge any added sugar on the next batch.


Top peaches with the remaining flour mixture, sprinkle the top with the remaining tablespoon of sugar and drizzle the remaining 1/4 cup of melted butter all over.


Bake at 350 degrees F for about 50 minutes, or until bubbly, batter is cooked through and the top is lightly browned.


Devour!


Recipe: Winter Peach Cobbler

©From the Kitchen of Deep South Dish
Prep time: 10 min |Cook time: 50 min | Yield: About 4 servings

Ingredients
  • 1 cup of self rising flour
  • 1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon of granulated sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) of unsalted butter, divided and melted separately
  • 1 (28 ounce) can of sliced peaches in heavy syrup
Instructions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Butter an 8 x 8 inch baking dish; set aside. Whisk together the cup of flour with 1/2 cup of sugar and a pinch of salt. Add 1/4 cup of the butter that has been melted and using a fork, mix together until crumbs form.

Sprinkle about 1/3 of the crumb mixture into the bottom of the prepared baking dish. Evenly distribute the peaches in the baking dish and pour all of the syrup on top. If juices do not nearly cover peaches add just a bit of additional water to cover. Top peaches with the remaining flour mixture, sprinkle the top with the remaining tablespoon of sugar and the remaining 1/4 cup of melted butter. Bake at 350 degrees F for about 50 minutes, or until bubbly, batter is cooked through and the top is lightly browned.

Cook's Notes: Please note this recipe calls for self-rising flour, not all-purpose. Double for a 9 x 13 inch dish. Rather than trying to evenly divide the melted butter, I just cut the stick in half and melt each half individually. For fresh peaches, peel and slice, sprinkle with an additional 1/2 cup of sugar and refrigerate for 2 to 3 hours before using - you'll need about 3 cups of slices - roughly 4 large peaches. If you substitute light canned peaches or unsweetened frozen peaches, the overall sweetness of your cobbler will be affected.

Source: http://deepsouthdish.com

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©Deep South Dish
Adapted from Blue Willow Inn Cookbook
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Posted by on January 15, 2014

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28 comments:

  1. Yummy will be making this today for dessert!!

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    Replies
    1. I hope you enjoy it April - it's certainly good weather for it!

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  2. Made this today using a 29 oz. can of light (syrup) peaches which is all I had in the house. I added about 1/2 cup of light brown sugar & it was the perfect sweetness. I finished it off with a dollop of cool whip & hubby & I ate the entire pan after dinner. Thanks for a delicious peach cobbler recipe.

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    Replies
    1. I can certainly believe it Tricia because it's easy for this to disappear at my house too!! Thanks also for the input on the light syrup peaches as well.

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  3. This sounds so good and easy....perfect for a quick dessert. I have a 20 oz jar of peaches peaches, do you think this would work? Pinned this and now I want to make it....help! I'm hungry. lol Thanks for sharing.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, it will work fine! You'll just be a little short on peaches but the overall cobbler won't suffer. Hope you enjoy it!

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  4. Made this for supper and OH MY GOODNESS!!! Divine! Next time I will use more peaches, but no complaints tonight! Thanks again!

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  5. This looks delicious Mary and I know it's a real winter treat. We had a friend who would freeze Georgia Belle's, make cobbler in the winter and invite us for supper.

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  6. Great peach cobbler recipe, I made it last night, it was wonderful!!

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    1. Glad you enjoyed it & thank you so much for taking the time to let me know!

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  7. Hi, My mom passed in 2007 and how I wished I had sat down with her and gotten a compiled book of all her recipes. She was a master cook. But now I find myself looking for her tomato gravy recipe with a twist. She made a tomato gravy for breakfast that was sweet. Not sure if it had sugar or what in it, but it was delicious. She served it with biscuits made from scratch. The only thing I can remember from it was it had tomatoes and flour in it and she cooked it to a smooth consistency. I know there were no onions in it, but she had a pinch of salt and a maybe a snippit of pepper. Have any idea of what this one maybe? .

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    Replies
    1. Boy don't I understand that one! I lost my Mama that same year and still miss her so much today. Everyone makes tomato gravy a little different, so I can only offer my version of tomato gravy which does include some veggies, though they can certainly be left out. If your mom's gravy was sweet, it was very likely from sugar - either granulated or brown sugar, or even a combination of them both. I sometimes add sugar to fresh tomatoes too depending on how sweet they are, although she could have used canned tomatoes or even canned pureed tomatoes or tomato sauce, which usually contain some sugar and then added more sugar as well on top of that for extra sweetness. The best thing to do is start with a base recipe and experiment! You'll get there.

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  8. I was wondering if you double the recipe and make a 9x13 pan, does it affect the baking time?

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    1. Because you are only doubling the surface area and not the thickness, it will be about the same cooking time. Just be sure to check it in the middle to see if it needs to go just a bit longer!

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  9. This looks amazing! I love the idea of adapting a summer recipe so that it's suitable for winter.

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  10. Tried this last night. It was delish and the family loved it. Thanks for sharing

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    1. You're welcome Sylvia! I'm so glad that your family enjoyed it & thanks so much for coming back by to let me know!!

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  11. Just finished making this...I'm also making your split pea soup recipe....can't wait to eat. I made the cobbler with peach pie filling b/c that is what I had in pantry, have you ever done that? Love this site. Thank you so much for giving it to us :)

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    1. Aw, thanks so much!!! Pie filling does actually make a pretty good stand in for cobbler!

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  12. I stumbled upon your site and I am so glad I did. I read your recipe for peach cobbler and said out loud, now this is a true southern lady, she knows her peach cobbler. I grew up on this stuff and it was what I wanted every birthday instead of a cake. I watched a show tonight where one of the cooks said they were gonna make a peach cobbler, the thing looked like a peach pie. Big difference between a peach pie and a cobbler. lol

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    Replies
    1. Thank you so much & welcome! I pretty much like cobbler any way that you make it but have to say, to me, this version is the most classic. You are not the first person that I've heard of who has said they preferred this over a birthday cake!!

      Thank you for stopping by to visit & for taking the time to comment. I hope that you come back again soon & find some recipes to try!

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  13. I love your stories. I have a question - How fluffy vs dense is the cake part of this recipe? If very light, can you use the dumpling batter over peaches, or does that mess with the ratio of fruit to topping? I'm a Midwestern girl so I tend to like dense toppings that hold their own on top of fruit desserts (even crisp toppings, like for a rhubarb crisp). But I've lived in Texas for 12 years and my Texan husband is craving some peach cobbler...and I just got some homemade canned peaches.

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    1. Hi Jill! It's not very cake-like really, hard to describe. The under layer of the crumbs gets a bit gooey, like a pie I guess kinda and the top is tender and a bit fluffy like cake, but not dense and not very thick. This probably makes no sense!

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  14. Made a double batch of this tonight and my husband said he LOVED it. I did add just a little nutmeg into the batter since that is what he is used to in his cobbler.

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    1. Oh I'm so happy Deborah, thanks for letting me know!

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