Thursday, April 2, 2015

Boneless Prime Rib Beef Roast with au Jus

A boneless prime rib roast made with a rub of olive oil, herbs, spices and seasonings and served with an au jus. Offer an optional sour cream horseradish sauce at the table.

Boneless Prime Rib Beef Roast with au Jus

Most people are terrified of cooking a prime rib roast at home and for good reason. It is a very expensive cut of meat if you mess up! But, it's also a delicious cut of meat, so it's worth the effort, and, if you follow these four essential rules, you'll have a perfect, and impressive, holiday roast.

1. Let the roast come to room temperature before roasting.
2. Use a thermometer, preferably an in-oven version.
3. Cook roast to a medium rare, no further.
4. Always let the roast rest when it has finished roasting before slicing.

All of these are important to cooking a prime rib, whether it's a bone-in or boneless. I'm cooking a boneless roast here, so I've written the directions that way. With bone-in you're factoring in the weight of the bones when you purchase, of course, but bone-in meats of all kinds are certainly more flavorful. Look for boneless if you're looking for a more accurate measure of meat though both are equally delicious.

Y'all know I love meat with bones, no doubt about that, but this is such a great cut of beef that I don't miss the bone, and frankly I love the convenience of boneless. For heaven's sake though, if you get the butcher to trim and debone your roast, ask for the bones! You paid for them and you can use them to make a great stock for something like say, southern vegetable beef soup.

While any kind of instant read thermometer will work, I highly recommend using a Polder, or other brand of in-oven thermometer, cooking the roast strictly by temperature, and ignoring any suggested cooking time. Temperature, not time is most important here, and I really believe using a Polder is the number one biggest secret behind getting it right. I use my Polder for all my roasted meats now, and it has never once failed me.

You can find these in home stores locally or order from Amazon for your next holiday!
It's important to also remember especially with this roast, that resting time will conduct what is called carry-over cooking, so you'll need to factor that into your cooking time to be sure to get the roast where you want it. I like mine medium rare, so I cook it to 130 degrees F, which, after resting, generally rises to around 145 degrees F. Prime rib is generally best when prepared to a medium rare, not well done. If you have someone who prefers their roast more well done, prepare the au jus, cut a slice and simmer it in a pan with the jus to cook further to desired appearance.

You don't really need to do much with a prime rib roast, though I do like to get some kind of a crusty herb rub on the outside. Here's how I make my prime rib roast.

Place roast into a small roasting pan or baking dish. Combine the olive oil and seasonings and rub all over roast.


Let rest at room temperature for 1 hour.


Preheat oven to 500 degrees F. Transfer roast to oven and roast, uncovered, at 500 degrees F for 20 minutes. I don't have a small roaster, so I just grabbed this Temptations piece from the cabinet. My brain wanted to think I remembered Tara saying they were safe to 500 degrees but I was praying the whole time it would hold up for this first step. We made it, but you may want to play things a little safer with a different roasting pan, just in case my rememberer is wrong!

Remove roast and insert thermometer probe. Reduce oven temperature to 375 degrees F return roast to oven and continue roasting until internal temperature reaches 130 degrees F for medium rare, approximately 17 minutes per pound (about 1 hour longer). If you like your roast much more on the rare side, remove it when the internal temp reaches between 115 and 120 degrees F. I took my last roast to 120 and didn't let it rest quite as long and it was a little more pink end to end, but very rare in the center - a little too rare for us.

Let roast rest at least 30 minutes before removing the netting. Carryover cooking will bring roast up another 10 to 15 degrees or so, and should result in a medium rare finished roast as pictured. Carve into desired thickness, generally between 1/4 inch and 1/2 inch thick. Here's the final roast, nice and crusty on the outside thanks to the initial high temperature searing and while the outside edges are more medium and brown in color on the finished roast, even that meat is so moist and tender. It's perfect for how we like our roast!


For the horseradish sauce, combine the ingredients, taste and adjust seasonings as needed. Offer as a condiment at the table.


To make the au jus, add the wine to the roasting pan and scrape up all any browned residue from the bottom of the roasting pan. Place pan over burners, or transfer drippings to a skillet or saucepan, add the broth and bring to a boil, cooking until reduced. Stir in Worcestershire sauce, taste and season with salt and pepper, only if needed. I didn't do it for the picture so I could keep it clean looking, but I like to dip the sliced roast into the au jus, then platter the slices, transferring the rest of it into a gravy boat to serve alongside the roast.


Oh my gracious is this roast good y'all. Just thinking about it makes my mouth water and makes me want a sandwich!




Recipe: Boneless Prime Rib Beef Roast with au Jus

©From the Kitchen of Deep South Dish
Prep time: 10 min |Cook time: 1 hour 30 min | Yield: About 8 to 10 servings

Ingredients
  • 4 to 5 pound netted, boneless prime rib roast, trimmed
  • 1-1/2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander seed
  • 1 teaspoon ground celery seed
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon Creole or Cajun seasoning
  • 2 teaspoons freshly cracked black pepper
For the Au Jus:
  • 1/2 cup of red wine
  • 1 cup of beef stock or broth
  • 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
For the Horseradish Sauce:
  • 1 cup of sour cream
  • 2 teaspoons of apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 teaspoon of Creole mustard
  • 2 tablespoons of horseradish
  • 1/2 teaspoon of cayenne pepper or Cajun seasoning (like Slap Ya Mama)
  • Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper, to taste
Instructions

Place roast into a small roasting pan or baking dish. Combine the olive oil and seasonings and rub all over roast. Let rest at room temperature for 1 hour.

Preheat oven to 500 degrees F. Transfer roast to oven and roast, uncovered, at 500 degrees F for 20 minutes. Remove roast and insert thermometer probe. Reduce oven temperature to 375 degrees F return roast to oven and continue roasting until internal temperature reaches 130 degrees F for medium rare (about 1 hour longer), or approximately 17 minutes per pound longer. Remove roast from oven and let rest at least 30 minutes before removing the netting. Carryover cooking will bring roast up another 10 degrees or so, and should result in a medium rare finished roast as pictured. Carve into desired thickness, generally between 1/4 inch and 1/2 inch.

To make the au jus, add the wine to the roasting pan and scrape up all any browned residue from the bottom of the roasting pan. Place pan over burners, or transfer liquid to a skillet or saucepan, add the broth and bring to a boil, cooking until reduced.  Stir in Worcestershire sauce, taste and season with salt and pepper, only if needed. Transfer to a gravy boat to serve alongside the roast.

For the horseradish sauce, combine the ingredients, taste and adjust seasonings as needed. Offer as a condiment at the table.

Cook's Notes: If roast is frozen when purchased, allow at least 2 days of thaw time in the refrigerator before cooking. Medium rare is recommended for this cut of beef. Remove the roast when internal temperature reaches 130 degrees F for medium rare as internal temperature will continue to rise during the resting stage to approximately 145 degrees F. Do not skip resting the meat; otherwise the juices will not redistribute and your roast will be dry and tough. If you prefer to make the au jus without alcohol, just increase the stock or broth. Use other fresh herbs - rosemary, oregano, or a mix like herbes de provence, or a bit of each, as desired.

Source: http://deepsouthdish.com

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Posted by on April 2, 2015

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28 comments:

  1. Sounds good Mary. If you'd like to have more of the inside be red, you might want to give reverse sear a try - it takes a little longer but well worth it to me - http://bigdudesramblings.blogspot.com/2011/10/rib-roast-revisited.html

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Larry! I am familiar with that process, but haven't ventured into preparing this expensive piece of meat enough to experiment yet!!

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  2. I love beef but I have to have mine cooked to medium well done. I just can't eat it if I see it red or pink. David Venable (QVC) also mentioned that he likes his meat medium well done also. If you notice he always takes the end pieces off the roasts & steaks. I use a meat thermometer too when cooking meat. It always comes out just right.

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    1. Hey Tricia! I'm a very big QVC shopper and a super fan of David's so I've definitely noticed he likes the end pieces on those roasts. He also doesn't eat much seafood though I've seen him dig on the crab cakes LOL!! My hubby is the same way with beef though I have leaned him more toward a medium rare, especially for prime rib and ribeyes. It's not to say that you can't cook it more done at all - you sure can. I just think it's best in my opinion when it's cooked to a medium rare as far as texture & tenderness goes. It's all good though! Those thermometers sure do make cooking a roast pretty foolproof. I use mine all the time!

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  3. Prime Rib is my favorite thing to eat EVER! This looks DIVINE!

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    1. It is mighty tasty! Too bad it's so darned expensive though. I guess that makes it kinda special because we only have it once, maybe twice a year on a holiday!!

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  4. Hi Mary, I'm with you on cooking beef medium rare. I think it loses too much flavor if cooked above medium, but everyone is different, especially when it comes to the way they want things cooked. Question, when you say resting, do you mean resting outside of the oven or cutting the oven off and let it rest in there? When you say the temp inside will continue to rise to 145 degrees confuses me, especially if resting outside of the oven.

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    1. Hi Becky! Sorry if I was confusing there! Remove the roast from the oven and let it rest on a wooden cutting board or cooling rack. It will continue to cook inside as it rests, what they call "carry over cooking" which will bring the internal temperature up to around 145 or so. The resting also allows the juices to redistribute so that when you slice it, it doesn't all just run out onto the board. Hope that helps!

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    2. Thanks Mary, it looks delicious and we love prime rib. One more question..what temp do i need to cook it to for it to come out rare? The med. rare looks to done on the ends for us, we like it all pink. Thanks

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    3. Take it somewhere between 115 to 120 degrees F then remove it from the oven and let it rest. The last time I did that I stopped it at 120 and it was pretty pink from end to end and quite rare in the center. Was a little too rare for the hubby! I haven't quite gotten him there yet. :) I'll try to remember to dig out an old picture and post it to show the difference for you later today. I've got all 3 grandkids all day today though so it might be a bit - pray for me LOL!!

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    4. Thanks again Mary, i think i'll take it to somewhere between 120-125. If it was only me eating, i would do 115, i like it that rare. If we go to a restaurant with others, people, they don't understand how i can eat a steak with all that blood on the plate but that's the way i like it, love it actually..lol. Yes, if you can find the picture and post i would appreciate it. Have a wonderful time with your grandkids today and when you feel like you want to pull your hair out, remember, they'll only be this age once, so enjoy every moment. And I'll say a little prayer for you, just in case. :)

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    5. It's 3:30 in the afternoon and Grandma Mary is ready to go to bed LOL!! It's not so much the grands as it is one of them with his friend from up the street. Whew!!

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  5. Great tips. Prime rib is one of the easiest meats to cook if you follow the simple guidelines you set forth, especially cooking by temp. Solid info here, great post.

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    1. Thanks Chris! I'm certainly no expert but I do learn through trial and error!!

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  6. Shhhhhhhh.....

    Listen carefully Mary........

    Hear it?

    That's you back porch SCREAMING at you to get a Big Green Egg lol, then you can sear the meat in at 650 degrees AND get a nice wood smoke flavor to the outside. PLUS it's as easy to use and regulate the temperature as your oven, maybe even easier.

    (I know, you want one and that was mean...... I mean motivational. Yeah, motivational is what I was looking for..... that's the ticket.)

    Just plain old regular horseradish that hasn't been fiddled with is getting harder and harder to find around here. Kinda like plain old fashioned grits. (you can find tons of instant and *quick* grits though at the store). Last time I made horsey sauce, I had to use creamed horseradish which seemed like it took 10 pounds to get the good flavor..........


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    1. You are right about the GE although my biggest motivator for getting one appears to be using a Kamado now, so I'm really confused LOL! :)

      I don't mind pretty much any quick grits, but I've been ordering stone ground from Palmetto Farms from SC. Those are quite good & I've gotten spoiled on them. I just reordered and got some of their cornmeal to give it a try too. Been buying that from the Great Smoky Mountain Park. I've gotten spoiled on that for my cornbread too and you won't find stone ground anything around here. It's mostly grocery store cornbread mix now - I guess that's what the public demands!

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  7. Dang forgot to *sign* the post above so you would know who it is. I STILL can't get my word press ID situation sorted out........

    Emugg

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  8. Do I have to trim all the fat on top of Roast?
    Thanks Elena

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    Replies
    1. You do not Elena! My roast is boneless, so it's already trimmed and netted. It's actually a personal preference, though many chefs do remove most of it, but unless the fat cap is overly thick, I'd leave it or only slightly trim it down.

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  9. Got your cook book today from QVC and have been following you for years , love the book .
    Connie from Chesapeake Va .

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh wow Connie, that's so good to hear you got it already!! They got them out fast! I'm so glad to hear that you love it too - thank you so much.

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  10. Mary, your food has always taken me back to my Mother's kitchen. I ordered your cookbook, and received notice that it will arrive tomorrow. I can't wait to get my hands on it!!!

    Thank you for being true to yourself because you have blessed so many of us who love down-home cooking.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you SO much Toni & I really hope you love the cookbook!

      Delete
  11. Is there any way to contact you personally to ask a question?
    Jodi T.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sure Jodi! I get a lot of mail so using the "contact me" link up at the top is the best way because I can spot those in the inbox easy. Otherwise you can write to me anytime at mary@deepsouthdish.com

      Delete

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