Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Everyday Creamy Mashed Potatoes

A less decadent, homemade mashed potato recipe, intended for basic, everyday use, any day. Pictured here with my Mississippi Roast and gravy.

Everyday Creamy Mashed Potatoes

Roasted, baked, twice-baked, butter steamed, in casseroles - no matter how you make them, we sure do love our potatoes in The South and most especially... we really love them mashed and creamy.

Served plain, with just a pat of melting butter as pictured above, made Creole style with an onion and an egg, or with green onion infused milk. Mixed with cabbage, piped into rosettes, or doused with cheese and twice baked in a casserole and loaded. We just love them all.

They are delicious when made into patties and fried to a crusty crunch on the outside, and decadent when, over the holidays we give ourselves permission to load them with plenty of heavy cream, butter and even cream cheese, and often, making them for a crowd. But, for regular everyday meals during the week and on weekends, we usually keep them a bit more tame. This is how I make my regular, any day mashed potatoes and while a bit less decadent, they are still mighty good.

Bring a large pot filled with plenty of water - at least double the volume of the potatoes - to a boil, and be sure to also generously salt it, before adding in the potatoes. If you do this, you likely will not need much, if any, additional salt. Rather than boil them whole, or even in larger chunks, I like to peel the potatoes and cut them into a smaller dice for these everyday mashed potatoes. The smaller dice makes them both quicker to cook for those weekday meals and easier to hand mash... but, it also makes them absorb more water. I'm not fond of watery potatoes, so once they are drained, I return them to the pot just briefly, over a low heat, to help drive out any excess water before mashing and adding the butter and milk.

Since we are foregoing whole milk or heavy cream for this version, using evaporated milk also helps with the creaminess, since it is a concentrated milk product that has had more than half of the water cooked out. I usually add about two tablespoons of butter to mine, though you can indulge a bit more if you like and add up to a full stick, for the extra creaminess and flavor.


Here's how to make them.

Recipe: Everyday Creamy Mashed Potatoes

©From the Kitchen of Deep South Dish
Prep time: 10 min |Cook time: 15 min | Yield: About 4 to 6 servings

Ingredients
  • 4 pounds of Russet potatoes (about 5 to 6 large)
  • 1 tablespoon of kosher salt, for the water
  • 2 to 4 tablespoons of butter, or to taste, softened at room temperature
  • 1/4 teaspoon of white pepper or freshly ground black pepper, or to taste
  • 2 (5 ounce) cans of evaporated milk, well shaken
Instructions

Bring a large pot of water to a boil; add the salt. Meanwhile, peel and cut potatoes into a large dice, add to the boiling water all at once. Boil until potatoes are fork tender, about 12 to 15 minutes. Drain well. Return potatoes to the pot and heat over low for a few minutes to extract any excess water, stirring often.

Keeping the pot over a very low heat, add the butter and pepper to the potatoes and hand mash thoroughly. Begin to slowly incorporate the evaporated milk, a little at a time, gently stirring, until potatoes reach desired consistency. You won't use all of the milk. Taste and adjust salt and pepper as needed. Serve immediately.

Cook’s Notes: Add a little Cajun seasoning if you like. Can also use a hand or stand mixer if you prefer not to hand mash. For a richer, more indulgent mashed potato dish, increase the butter up to a full stick. Transfer any leftover evaporated milk to a glass container for other use.

Skinny Version: Boil the potatoes in about 4 cups of chicken broth; drain but reserve the broth. Mash potatoes without the addition of milk and butter, by adding some of the broth back to the potatoes, until they reach the desired consistency. Season to taste. Can also substitute margarine, or a reduced fat butter replacement for the butter, as well as a lowfat, skim milk or buttermilk, to reduce calories.

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Posted by on September 26, 2012
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14 comments:

  1. Oh I love me some mashed potatoes. Especially Colcannon! They are on the menu at church dinner tonight. I cannot wait!

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    Replies
    1. I love those too.. but then again, I haven't met a mashed potato I didn't like so far either LOL!!

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  2. I had forgotten the secret of adding evap milk to a recipe, Mom used it always for mashed potatoes. I buy half and half to use and that's a lot of calories added... but who's counting? :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My favorite is the holiday version - with lots of butter, heavy cream, whole milk & cream cheese. Gracious are those good!!

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  3. My mashed potatoes are a huge hit with my whole family! Everybody wonders what that little extra ingredient is that I use. It surprised everyone when I told them it was mayo! Also gives it a lil somethin extra to boil in some diced onion with the potatoes.. :)

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  4. Hey Mary. I'm almost embarassed to ask this question, as I'm a grown Southern woman who should know the answer. But I don't. I adore mashed potatoes but sometimes when I make them, they turn out kind of sticky and gooey. And sometimes they're perfect. What the heck am I doing wrong?

    Thanks!

    Carla

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Overbeating is usually the culprit, often because we sometimes end up with those pesky lumps and hope we can beat them out!! Cut the potatoes into a dice and once they are cooked and fully tender, try the method above with adding them back to the pot to extract any extra moisture before mashing them. This is the easiest way to avoid overbeating, though bigger batches are nice to do in a stand mixer or with hand mixer. Just be gentle and never beat on high if you go that route. Never use a food processor - it definitely beats them too high and will guarantee gummy potatoes! Dice, boil, dry, then butter and seasoning mashed in first, before the milk goes in. Hope that helps!

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  5. I love mashed potatoes but we rarley have them except on special occasions - what's wrong with us? Your everyday ones are just the way my mom made them (canned milk and butter).

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  6. Do you have a recipe for the gravy in this photo? Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi! The gravy in this picture is from my Mississippi Roast - and it's a crockpot recipe too! You can find that right here!

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