Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Southern Fried Potatoes

Southern fried potatoes, also known as Southern style hash brown potatoes, or, simply soft fried potatoes, are cubed peeled russets, that are first steamed and then pan fried like hash browns, tender inside, but with crispy outer edges.

Southern Fried Potatoes

I can hardly believe this is my first post for November and yet, here we are, nearly a week in already, and whoa, is Thanksgiving really knocking on the door already?

It's been a, well... let's just say... challenging week around the ole household.The Cajun and I both managed to pick up a bug - me first, right on Halloween afternoon - and one that pretty much knocked us out of commission for days, something that never happens to my husband. It appears that we're on the mend... finally, and these soft fried potatoes, a favorite around here, really hit the spot when you've been on an involuntary fast.

Potatoes cooked with this method are sometimes known as a Southern style hash brown, mostly by commercial producers, because we've always just called them soft fried potatoes. These are somewhat similar to my cast iron Skillet Potatoes - a simple Deep South take on Potatoes O'Brien, due to the inclusion of bell pepper (and sometimes mushrooms if I have them), the major difference being the type of potato used and the method of preparation. Soft fried potatoes are peeled and steamed first before pan frying, resulting in a super tender and creamy inside, while having a crispy hash brown like exterior. The key for these is that you must first steam fry the potatoes covered.

For frying these, I typically use mostly oil with just a touch of bacon fat or butter for flavor, but you can use your favorite combination of fats. You'll need about 1/2 cup total, more or less, or just enough to cover the bottom of a nice sized skillet. It's a very easy recipe to do, but if you've never made them before, I've included a step by step tutorial that'll give you an idea of what they are supposed to look like at each stage.

Super delicious for breakfast next to eggs, at lunch with a variety of leftovers from the fridge stirred in, from beans and leftover meats to veggies, or as a simple side dish starch for any meal. Some folks even like to stir in ketchup just before serving them, but I prefer mine pretty straight up with potatoes and onion.

There's no secret to these - we Southerners pretty much all make them the same way. Here's how we do it.

Add your choice of fat - oil, butter, bacon drippings or a combination of them all work well - to a fairly good sized, lidded skillet and heat over medium high heat. Peel and dice regular baking potatoes into small cubes and add to the hot oil.


Finely chop some onions - I favor a sweet or yellow onion myself.


Add to the potatoes.


Season with salt and pepper to taste.


Stir the potatoes and onion to coat them well with the oil.


Cover and steam over medium high heat for 10 minutes, without lifting the lid or stirring the potatoes.


Remove the cover.


Use a spatula to turn potatoes in sections. Look at those crispies there - yum!


Continue cooking over medium high, turning and stirring occasionally, until potatoes are browned. Great with breakfast, or as a side dish anytime. Oh mercy, these are so good!


We eat them all kinds of ways, but the classic Southern way to consume fried taters and onions, is very often with a big pot of some kind of beans, with greens and cornbread on the side. Now that's Southern y'all.

Recipe: Southern Fried Potatoes

©From the Kitchen of Deep South Dish
Prep time: 5 min |Cook time: 15 min | Yield: About 4 to 6 servings

Ingredients
  • About 1/2 cup of vegetable or canola oil, bacon fat, butter, or any combination
  • 2 pounds of russet potatoes (about 4 to 5), peeled and diced
  • 1/2 cup of finely chopped onion
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
Instructions

Add enough oil just to cover the bottom of a 10-inch skillet and heat over medium high. Add the potatoes and onion; season to taste with salt and pepper and toss to coat with oil. Cover skillet and steam cook for 10 minutes covered, before stirring. Remove cover, turn in sections, and continue cooking over medium high, uncovered, turning and stirring occasionally, until potatoes are browned as desired.

Excellent with eggs but makes a great side dish anytime.

Cook's Notes: These potatoes make an great base for any leftover meats, veggies, or even beans that you have in the fridge. Stir them in toward the end, just to warm through. Eggs are also a great addition. Beat, add to potatoes and let set slightly before stirring.

Source: http://deepsouthdish.com

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©Deep South Dish
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Posted by on November 6, 2012
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52 comments:

  1. While we have just always called these fried taters with onions we ALL WAYS serve them with a big pot of beans, turnip greens and cornbread on the side....

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    Replies
    1. Don't you just love that word taters?!!

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    2. This has always been one SURE way to wake up my family on a camping trip! That, and a big, steaming pot of boiled coffee. We never felt like we had "fully arrived" at the campground until those taters were served.

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    3. I hear ya on that - hopefully some fresh fried fish later on too!

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  2. You've just made me soooo hungry!

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  3. :) I didn't know this was a "recipe." I just thought it was something my mom made when she didn't have anything else in the fridge! We always used to have fried potatoes and brown beans. Maybe I should put on a pot of beans in the morning for supper tomorrow night...

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    1. I had a guy tell me today that he never could figure out why his fried potatoes never came out like he remembered, then he read my "recipe" and figured out what he was doing wrong!! I love that. Thank goodness for southern food blogs to carry on even the non-recipe southern recipes!! :)

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  4. I put a little bell pepper in mine and they are just the bomb with breakfast for supper. Taters with onions, bacon and/or sausage, eggs, grits with cheese and biscuits. OMG, might just have to have that tonight.

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  5. Oh, some fried okra on the side, cornbread, a fresh hot pepper from the garden and any meat that happens to be handy. To me meat is optional if there is enough bacon grease in the taters <3

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  6. All yes fried potatoes and onions - one of my very favorite things to eat and just perfect when you're ailing a little.

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  7. I finally made the perfect batch of fried taters n onions with the help of this entry. I had always been afraid of burning them but even with them looking really dark, they tasted so yummy! (They even looked like yours).. I used garlic infused olive oil with two pats of butter and VIOLA! :) Thank you yet again!

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    1. You're so welcome Trista! Glad the tutorial was helpful.

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  8. Definitely one of my favorite things to eat! I think I actually look forward to the fried potatoes when we go out for breakfast moreso than my usual omelette. Up here in Philly, they are usually known as home fries or hash browns. Whatever they're called though, they are GOOOOD!!! These are a comfort food for sure! Glad you're feeling better:)

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    1. Thanks Val - was a rough week for us. This getting older business is for the birds! Don't recover quite as easy as I used to. But getting older beats the alternative I guess LOL!!

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  9. This is something my grandmother used to make. I'm from Mississippi :). My husband also makes them and then adds eggs to it for breakfast tacos (a staple from his hometown in South Texas). I, however, have never been able to make them without them being mushy, and I think that is because no one has ever taught me how to do them. I am anxious to try your recipe. Maybe I can make them taste like they're supposed to now! :) Thanks so much!

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    1. Oh, if you have time to come back I hope you'll let me know how they turn out and if this was helpful Kayla!

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  10. OH THANK YOU! My grandmother used to make these, and I didn't get the recipe from her before she passed away. I am so happy to find this - thank you, thank you!! It will be one of my favorites, I know.

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    1. You're so welcome Sara - I hope they are just what you remember!!

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  11. We had these often growing up. My Mom never met a potato she didn't like. Neither has my daughter.

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  12. Could literally live off of these!! Been eating this all my life and make it quite often. We add smoked sausage to ours and have that as a meal! We dice sausage (like Hillshire Farm jalapeno smoked sausage) into small chunks like the potatoes and add them after the steaming, then sop up with Tortilla. SO wonderful and always hits the spot!

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  13. I haven't had breakfast yet this morning but you have me wonderin' if I have any potatoes downstairs.

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  14. Thanks for the recipe, Mary. I have been trying to make these like my Mom did down in Roswell, NM when I was growing up. Never quit got it right. Now I know why. I was not steaming them properly. I just thought the lid was to keep the grease from spattering, never realized it was a crucial step in the process. Also, cutting the potatoes in cubes rather than spears helps to get a few more browned pieces in the skillet. Thanks <3

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    1. Oh thank you SO much for saying that Larry!! Sometimes it's just that one step or explanation that makes all the difference & is why I decided to do this website, not only to share the recipes but the tips & techniques that make a difference.

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  15. They are yummy,I do mine the lazy way though,I wash my taters and then just then slice them nice and thin,I have my skillet hot with just enough oil to coat the bottom,I put my taters in then some thin sliced onions with some salt and pepper and let them fry. :)

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  16. I am a true Okie and these were a staple growing up:) My grandma fixes them best!!! I have moved around a lot for the last ten years but I always go home for some fried taters:) This post made my mouth water!!! I love that you say "mercy" when describing how good they are:) It is fitting for sure. When I say mercy now people look at me like I am nuts:):)

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    1. What a great comment! Sure made me smile!! Thank you & come back and visit again!!

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  17. Mary I ain't never met a tater I didn't like. I'm so glad you posted this cuz we have this little diner in town that makes the best fryer taters and onions these look just like theirs, mine never did. I made them your way I was proud of. Thank you darling. The picky chicken nugget loving 3 y.o ate darn near a mountain of them, LOL

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    1. And I sure don't blame that baby!! I can finish off a mountain of them myself. :) Glad you enjoyed them Tracey - thanks for letting me know!!

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  18. a good addition to this recipe is to add a sprinkle of crushed red pepper, a touch of garlic salt, and use scallions instead of yellow or white onions. It really steps it up a bit!

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  19. have you ever tried frozen taters for this? Just wondering if I would need to make any adjustments.

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    1. Hey Sandi! You know, I'm really not sure. Have only used raw potatoes, so not sure if the frozen ones would do better from a frozen state or if you should thaw them first. Other than that, they should work fine!

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  20. I fry my taters in bacon grease and add onions, salt, pepper and garlic powder. Yummy!!!

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  21. I fry my taters in bacon grease and add onions, salt, pepper and garlic powder. Now, that's the way this southern girl makes fried taters and never do I have leftover's. Here's a tip if you want a different taste... Use mustard on your taters instead of ketchup.

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  22. I added some bell peppers & red onions to mine w/ cayenne pepper, fresh garlic, & sea salt fried in olive oil along with a side of lemon pepper spinach. Vegetarian friendly :-) After my fast I will try this w/ barbeque turkey wings & pineapple cornbread or fried fish & hushpuppies.

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  23. I just made some of these the other night using frozen diced potatoes (country hashbrowns - was out of potatoes in the pantry) and they worked perfectly! I let them sit out for about 20 minutes first...by accident...but they were perfect!

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  24. Mouth watering! Im heading to the store now for potatoes. I have to make this, its sounds delicious!

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    1. Gracious, these are so good - hope you enjoy them & please let me know what you think!!

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  25. Im heading to the store for potatoes now..my mouth is watering. This sounds delicious! Thanks for the recipe.

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  26. We fix potatoes like this back home. The only thing we do different is add shredded cheese to the top and let it melt then serve them and sometimes we eat them with out it

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