Saturday, April 21, 2012

Fresh Hot Corn on the Cob in (about) 4 minutes, No Husking, No Silks

This super easy method of steaming corn uses un-husked corn, cooked in your microwave, and results in a clean cob with no silk left behind, and corn that is tender-crisp and ready to eat! Includes video.

Microwave Steamed Corn

Let me repeat that. Fresh, steamed, hot corn on the cob, ready to eat, with no, that's ZERO husking at all, about 4 minutes per ear (depending on your microwave), and you do not have to deal with those pesky silks that are impossible to get off! You will have a clean cob with no work, and no silks. Okay... you might find like one single stray silk that stuck to the cob, but that will be about it. Seriously.

I know!

I wouldn't have believed it if I hadn't just done it myself. A couple times actually thanks to snatching some fresh Florida corn at my local Winn Dixie - 10 ears for three bucks. Couldn't pass that up. It went perfect with those gorgeous, hot and spicy crawfish we picked up at my local fish monger, Quality Seafood, the place I buy my seafood from when my hunter-gatherer doesn't bring it home to me. Mercy those were some great crawfish.


I first heard about this last year when a reader sent me a link to the video embedded below, but then forgot about it until it was sent to me again this year. I admit. I was certainly skeptical, but I shared it on the Facebook page, several of us have tried it and I'll be the dickens. It really does work y'all!

I do have to say that mine didn't quite shake out so easily like his did. I had to sort of coax it out a little bit by squeezing it from the bottom, kinda like you would with a frozen ice pop. The fella in the video has four ears of corn out but only does two at a time, so most of us have only done one or two ears at a time. Nobody has ventured out into doing say a half dozen of them all at once, so if you happen to try it, please let us know.

Here's how simple this is. Take your one or two ears of un-husked corn just as you buy them from the store - don't do a thing to them - and place them into the microwave, setting it on high for about 4 minutes per ear. The actual time will be dependent on the power of your own microwave. My microwave is small and not very powerful, so I went for 5 minutes for one ear, for my microwave 6 minutes is even better.


After it has finished cooking, use heavy oven mitts or some Ove gloves to remove it from the microwave and hack off the larger end of the cob with a sharp serrated knife. Remember this is very hot corn, so use your gloves while handling.


And then just shake it out of the husk. Or, if you're like me, I had to squeeze it out, and just grip it as it comes out with the other oven glove, or gently coax it out with a pair of tongs. If it doesn't release fairly easily out of the husk either by shaking or pulling, then it probably should go a little longer, so add a minute each time you do another ear until you get the perfect ear and learn the timing for the power level of your microwave.


This is how it looks when you get it out of the husk. Is that not just crazy or what? It is literally a clean cob. I found one very tiny strand of silk on this piece. That is it!


Just in case you don't believe me - check this close up out. Gorgeous and no silk!


And, as if that's not crazy-easy enough, this corn is beautifully steamed and completely ready to eat. It is tender-crisp, with a nice bite, and just perfect. Just add butter and salt, or whatever you want and consume, or let it cool a bit then cut it off the cob for some fresh corn to add to any dish where you'd normally use frozen or canned. Delish. Easy. Gotta love it!


Seems silly, but for the purposes of saving this to your recipe box, here's the "recipe!"

Recipe: Fresh Hot Corn on the Cob in (about) 4 minutes, No Husking, No Silks

©From the Kitchen of Deep South Dish
|Cook time: 4 to 6 min | Yield: 2 ears


Ingredients
  • 1 or 2 ears of corn, unhusked
  • Butter, salt and pepper, to taste
Instructions

Take your one or two ears of un-husked corn just as you buy them from the store - don't do a thing to them - and place them into the microwave, setting it on high for about 4 minutes per ear. The actual time will be dependent on the power of your own microwave. My microwave is small and not very powerful, so I went for 5 minutes for one ear, for my microwave 6 minutes is even better.

After it has finished cooking, use heavy oven mitts or some Ove gloves to remove it from the microwave and hack off the larger end of the cob with a sharp serrated knife. Remember this is very hot corn, so use your gloves while handling.

And then just shake it out of the husk. Or, if you're like me, I had to squeeze it out, and just grip it as it comes out with the other oven glove, or gently coax it out with a pair of tongs. If it doesn't release fairly easily out of the husk either by shaking or pulling, then it probably should go a little longer, so add a minute each time you do another ear until you get the perfect ear and learn the timing for the power level of your microwave.

Source: http://deepsouthdish.com

Requires Adobe Reader - download it free!
©Deep South Dish

Pretty cool, huh?

By the way, here's the quick video ... WARNING: Very loud banjo music starts off this video, so turn your volume down a bit before viewing! (Update - last I checked, the sound was completely out on this video. I'm gonna leave it up though, just in case they get that corrected!)


☛ Oven Roasted "No Husk" Corn

This same method can be done right in your oven too. Place unshucked corn in a preheated 350 degree F oven for 25-30 minutes. Use pot holders to hold the corn and cut off the larger end. Shake the corn out of the husk and serve. You may also leave the husks on and simply fold them back as handles for holding.

For many more ways to cook corn on the cob, pop by this post 'How to Cook Corn on the Cob' and be sure to check out the compound butter blends too!

Are you on Facebook? If you haven't already, come and join the party! We have a lot of fun & there's always room for one more at the table.

Check These Recipes Out Too!

Fresh Corn and Black Bean Salsa
Fresh Corn Salad
Summer Succotash with Okra

Posted by on April 21, 2012
Images and Full Post Content including Recipe ©Deep South Dish. Recipes are offered for your own personal use only and while pinning and sharing links is welcomed and encouraged, please do not copy and paste to repost or republish elsewhere such as other Facebook pages, blogs, websites, or forums without explicit prior permission. All rights reserved.

Material Disclosure: Unless otherwise noted, you should assume that post links to the providers of goods and services mentioned, establish an affiliate relationship and/or other material connection and that I may be compensated when you purchase from a provider. You are never under any obligation to purchase anything when using my recipes and you should always perform due diligence before buying goods or services from anyone via the Internet or offline.
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55 comments:

  1. This looks amazing, I can't wait to try it! Thanks for sharing!
    xx

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    1. I know! Is this not the craziest thing? But it really does work - my new way to enjoy basic corn on the cob!

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  2. I may try this with grocery store corn but no matter how we spray our homegrown corn there is an occasional worm or two in there lol - no way.

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  3. We've cooked our corn this way for years.

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    1. Guess I'm one of the 99% who haven't! Glad to have discovered the method because I've always boiled, and what a pain!

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  4. Wow!f I can't wait to try this method!!!

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  5. Look do-able but why was your grocery store selling field corn? Unless field corn is different in Florida than in Minnesota

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    1. Hi Rachel - if you're looking for proper grammar/English/context/definitions then you're in the wrong spot so just relax when you come here, enjoy the content and I promise you might have a good time. Thanks for stopping by!

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    2. Field corn here too in West Tennessee. Guess we call it field corn because it is not processed in a car It's a Southern thing I guess.

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    3. I think you are correct! But then some folks who don't live in the south throw away the greens from a turnip and felt.at least in the past, that our field peas to be worthless and nothing more than animal feed! :)

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  6. I have to try this one. If you can get rid of the worst part of corn on the cob then this is a must!

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    1. It's great Debby and the corn is cooked fantastic!

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  7. And I thought I knew something because I knew how to steam it in the husk. I'd then run cold water on the cob as I pulled off the husk. Your way is so cool. Can't wait to try it. Thanks

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    1. Oh it's not my invention, I only recently discovered it myself Patsy but it is a wonderful method. Let me know what you think!!

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  8. I just watched this video when someone else sent it to me the other day!! Must be making the rounds, LOL!! It is a great trick, and I'm going to try it next time.

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    1. Yeah, it's actually been around awhile but usually makes the rounds every spring. I totally forgot about it myself, so figured I'd better post until it become ingrained LOL!!

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  9. Fantastic, love the squeeze to shoot the corn out of the husk! How totally clever!Can't wait for some corn to appear at the market to try it out!

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    1. The Florida corn just started sowing up in our markets here in South Mississippi, so should be soon!!

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  10. This reminds me of the "cooler corn" trick. Very cool trick to remember.

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    1. Oh yeah - I'd forgotten about that! I've never done it but it seems a neat trick for when you have a big BBQ and need to do a lot of corn, though I do remember reading some cautions about it on snopes.com.

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  11. After reading this post about corn on the cob, I just can't wait until summer's bounty! We usually have a 'corn on the cob dinner' with nothing but, you got it: corn on the cob! It's awesome!

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    1. I'm the same way Roz - I can absolutely make a meal of it & gotta say, this first Florida corn was SOOOOO good!!

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  12. Can I just say that I was about to make corn this evening and now I am going to try it this way. I'm soo excited to be finding new ways and recipes through Pinterest!

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    1. I know what you mean! I hope that you love this method as much as I have. I will not say how much corn I have consumed trying this out LOL!!

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  13. Great idea! Thanks for sharing! Love your blog!

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  14. That is so cool and after enjoying corn on the cob (my favorite way to eat it) for 60 years, I can't believe this is just now showing up. I should have corn in about 6 weeks and will definitely try this. Of course I'll still have to open the top of mine a little to knock out the usual worm, but it should still work as long as I grab the silk tops.

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    1. I just enjoyed another ear done this way with my leftovers lunch! Thanks for the tip about homegrown corn - I was wondering about that.

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  15. I have been doing my corn in the microwave for about a year now, I've had some comments asking why I don't do it the "better/longer" way but it's so simple and yummy I don't see the point in putting myself through the trouble of boiling when this is just as good!

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    1. And truly, better if you ask me - besides that, variety is the spice of life right? I like corn all kinds of ways but this is a great replacement for boiling or steaming. Much easier, much faster, less hassle and the corn is just about as delicious as it could be! I got a link to that fella's video last year, but had completely forgotten about it until it was sent to me again this year. Loving this method!!

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  16. I had two cobs to cook one day and did it in the microwave because of shear laziness on my part and voila - beautiful corn! If I have more than 2-3 ears, I roast in the oven in its husks and it comes out just as clean. Takes a bit longer...about 30-40 minutes at 350-degrees.

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  17. I've been microwaving corn on the cob for the past 30 years . . or whenever I bought my 1st microwave. It was the only recipe in the cookbook that came with the microwave that was worth using.

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    1. LOL Paula, yeah, microwave "cooking" wasn't the best was it? Really you've been cooking it in the husk like this for 30 years? I do remember my old carousel cookbook talking about pulling the husks back but you still had to remove the silks, then replace the husks before microwaving. Not like this where you just stick in the whole cob without having to clean the silks first. I've cooked my corn in the microwave too for years, but not like this! I never even considered not removing the silks which really makes this entire process kinda revolutionary!! Throw in a whole corn, husks and all, and voila, done & no silks to clean. I'm so glad that I learned this method - it's fantastic not having to try to remove all the silks first, and the corn is delicious!!

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  18. Boy, I'm glad you posted this method of cooking corn on the cob before I spent the whole summer on the back porch husking corn! We tried it this evening at supper and it was perfect...it's going to be so nice (and cooler) this summer to not have to boil a big pot of water and get the kitchen all clammy and steamy.

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    1. Isn't it just crazy?!! I love corn all ways, but I especially love it just plain ole boiled with salt and butter the most. This method eliminates the hassle of all that cleaning & all the mess & to top it off, it's faster - I for one was thrilled to discover it!!

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  19. My late Grandmother taught me to do this. She always soaked her corn before microwaving it - about 10 minutes or so. Love doing it this way.

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    1. I'll have to try soaking to see the difference - I do that for grilling for sure, but have you tried it without soaking at all Karen? It really is delicious!!

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  20. Planning to try this with our late dinner tonight... Thank you for the suggestion! And also, bless you for the banjo music warning!

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    1. Oh you're welcome Rebecca - first time I clicked on that video it about scared me to death!!

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  21. This tip is a keeper! I've gone without fresh corn for years because of the trouble it entailed. Sorry, Birdseye,et al, you've been kicked to the curb!

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    1. I know! Is it not crazy?! I love good ole plain boiled corn on the cob myself the most - or well, I did - but this is my new way of eating it now!

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  22. I have used this technique also but for large baatches of corn I put a dozen ears of corn still in the husks in a 350 oven for 20-25 mins and then just cut the bottoms off and shake them out. easy peasy

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    1. Thanks for letting me know about the oven tip! I'm going to cook 6 ears tonight. It's not really a large batch, but I don't feel like doing only 2 at a time in the microwave, and I'm not feeling experimental today. :)

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  23. Great tip - thanks for sharing that!

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  24. I cannot believe how easy it is to cook the corn this way..I have cooked 4 ears at a time..4 min each= 16 min...came out GREAT!! I found that if the ear won't shake out I probably have not cut all the husks off the ear.. Thank you for your blog..found it on pinterest...
    Barb

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    1. Hi Barb! I know ... is that not just crazy?! When I saw this video & finally got around to trying it, I couldn't believe it! Sure beats all that husking and boiling business. Thanks so much for stopping back by and leaving a comment. I appreciate that so much. And welcome to the family!!

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  25. Just tried this, wow so easy and the kitchen stays cool. bonus-no pot to wash. Corn tastes great.
    Thanks Mary
    I posted as ananymous but this is Joan in NJ

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    1. Isn't it crazy? Since it's just the two of us at home now this is the way I cook it now. I'm not the biggest fan of grilled corn, but I tried some the other day using this method and then just finishing it by charring it on the grill when I cooked steaks. Pretty good, though I still think I like it best right out of the microwave!

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  26. I have tried it with as many as a dozen ears. It still wotks fine

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    1. Thank you for sharing! I haven't had the opportunity to do that many so I hadn't experimented with it. So you put all dozen ears in all at once then? I don't think my turntable could handle that many but it's sure nice to know it still works!

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  27. My wife has been microwaving corn (and other veggie) for a few years now. I usually have to shuck it and she would nuke it.

    THIS is the coolest thing since sliced bread lol. I am NEVER shucking an ear of corn again. Thanks. Does it work the same for roasting corn (never roasted corn before but thought I might try it.

    BTW I found a version with sound. Here is the addy, but you'll have to do whatever it is you do to embed it. Looks like MOST of the versions I could find had no sound. I thought it was just me.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7veSB257fQE

    EMugg

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    1. Isn't it crazy?! I love using this method now. Heck, I made some creamed corn from the cob and instead of cooking it raw, I precooked it in the mike using this method while I did something else and then finished it in the skillet. Thanks for the link. I think he tried to edit out the very loud banjo music from before and somehow lost the sound! I'll have to try to remember to come back to embed it later. :)

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