Monday, July 4, 2011

Easy Fresh Peach Cobbler

Super easy cobbler made with fresh peaches, cinnamon sugar and a simple buttery batter.

Easy Fresh Peach Cobbler

Cobbler has to be just about the one easiest dessert in existence, yet in its simplicity, it is both heart and belly warming. Apart from an old fashioned dumpling style cobbler, this is a basic old school batter that many of us, including me, have used for years and it works well with a wide variety of fruit. It used to be called cuppa cuppa cuppa cobbler, or 1-1-1 cobbler because it used one cup of butter, one cup of flour and one cup of sugar, though I've revised mine a bit from the original and use a method that is just a tad bit different. It's a very simple recipe and it works.

Southern Style Hissy Fit Warning: I recently saw somebody throw out the SSC again {that's Southern Shame Card} on somebody else for using canned peaches in a peach cobbler. Don't worry, 'they' do it to me all the time too - sort of like that whole so-called "authentic" southern cornbread thing. I really don't get why anybody needs to be uppity about what defines southern cooking anyway, but... there are still a few around who think they have the official rule book to dictate to the rest of us southern born folks, just how we are supposed to cook southern I guess. One of the worse side of the mouth insults you can say to a southern born and raised southerner is to say that "a real southerner" would or would not do something.

Well, you never mind them, bless their little ole hearts. There's not a thing wrong with using canned peaches for cobbler, but peak season for local southern peaches is June through September, so goodness yes, use fresh peaches when they are at peak and locally available! Sorta like that whole dried vs. fresh for hand pie thing I guess. If you love using those packages of dried fruit because it reminds you of your grandma, by all means use them! But, when fresh fruits are at peak and in season, why not use them too? {tucks away the old soapbox.}

Anyhoo.... I was gifted with a bag of white peaches that were born right here in a south Mississippi backyard! They might not be Georgia or North Carolina peaches - and I'll leave that debate to the Battle of the Best - but they're pretty darned tasty and a perfect vehicle for some cobbler if you ask me. Besides. You don't look a gift peach in the mouth, right? Okay, I'll stop, but anybody who wants to, can send me on a case of peaches and I'll be more than happy to do a taste test battle of the best between states, or heck even counties, for ya! Just sayin'.

You can make peaches easier to peel by using the same method as tomatoes, dipping them quickly into boiling water, then ice water, but honestly ripe peaches don't really take that long to peel using a soft skin peeler, or a good paring knife. You'll need about 4 cups of peeled and pitted peach halves. Coarsely chop those, and toss with 2 tablespoons of granulated sugar. You can also slice them if you prefer. Pour those into a buttered 8 x 8 inch baking dish.


Sprinkle the top of the peaches with a generous mixture of cinnamon and sugar. Whisk together one cup of self-rising flour and one cup of sugar. Be sure you're using self-rising flour, or in a pinch make up a substitute.


Stir in the butter, milk and egg; mix together until blended. Add lemon zest if using.


Pour batter over the peaches and bake at 325 degrees F for 55 minutes to one hour, or until golden brown and firm in the middle.


Scoop out a serving while its still warm, top with whipped cream, drizzle heavy cream on top, or top with a scoop of ice cream, and dig in!


Recipe: Fresh Southern Peach Cobbler

©From the Kitchen of Deep South Dish
Prep time: 15 min |Cook time: 55 min | Yield: About 4 to 6 servings

Ingredients
  • 4 cups of peaches, halved
  • 2 tablespoons of granulated sugar
  • Cinnamon Sugar
  • 1 cup of self rising flour
  • 1 cup of granulated sugar
  • 1/3 cup of butter, melted
  • 1/2 cup of milk
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/2 teaspoon lemon zest, optional
Instructions

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Butter an 8 x 8 inch glass baking dish. Slice or coarsely chop the peaches and toss with the 2 tablespoons of granulated sugar. Place into the bottom of the baking dish. Sprinkle top of peaches generously with the cinnamon sugar mixture.

In a separate mixing bowl whisk together the flour and 1 cup of sugar. Add the butter, milk, and egg; mix together until well blended. Stir in lemon zest if using. Pour batter over the peaches and bake uncovered, at 325 degrees F, for 55 minutes to one hour, or until golden brown and firm in the middle. Best served warm with a drizzle of heavy cream, a dollop of whipped cream, or a scoop of homemade ice cream. Double in a 9 x 13 inch baking dish for a potluck or party.

Note: You'll want about 1-1/2 pounds of fresh peaches, or about 8 small to medium sized peaches. May substitute one well-drained large (28 ounce) can of peaches, adjusting added sugar as needed, depending on whether you use peaches in light juice or heavy syrup. This recipe calls for self-rising flour which is pretty much a southern staple. In a pinch you can make up a substitute by using 1 cup sifted all purpose flour, 1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder and 1/8 teaspoon salt. Click here for the Easy Homemade Vanilla Ice Cream recipe.

Source: http://www.deepsouthdish.com/

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Posted by on July 4, 2011

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31 comments:

  1. Living in Denver is a little tortureous reading blogs from the south east. First it was the Vidalia onions that hadn't yet arrived in our markets, then the sweet corn that won't be at our farmer's markets for another couple weeks and now these Peaches. Our Colorado peaches are probably a few weeks away too. If I remember right, sometime in August. I can't wait to make some cobbler! :-)

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  2. Hi... my name is Sue... and I've used canned peaches in cobbler (insert horror movie pipe organ music here) ~ lol. Was a huge time saver *only once* when prepping for unexpected family arriving in 2 hrs. Truth be known, we can't always get great peaches here, but anxious to make this ~ thx for sharing:) Happy 4th!!!

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  3. OMG....we had white peach trees growing up (South Texas) and my Mom always made cobbler with them. She used a standard top and bottom pie crust and the cobbler was always beautiful as the white peaches (because of the darker centers) colored the juice. I never knew this peach had a name and I will look for a couple of trees for my yard. Thanks so much!

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  4. Sorry about that Lea Ann - but soon you'll be enjoying those Colorado peaches. One good thing is that you don't have to get in the "best southern peach" debate!

    LOL Sue, I thought I was in a 12-step peach meeting there for a second! :)

    Hi Mary! I plan to do a pastry one next!

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  5. Hi Mary, long time reader, first time commenter...I think.

    I use canned peaches all the time. They're a heck of a lot cheaper than fresh or frozen and they're super yummy. In fact, I just made a cobbler with them yesterday.

    BTW, I'm a southerner transplanted to the Pacific NW, and finding your blog was like getting a little bit of home shipped right to me.

    Love your recipes, and when I can't find one of my mama's, your site is the first place I look.

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  6. Hi Ava & thanks so much! I use canned peaches for recipes all the time, especially when peaches are out of season. Unless it's peak season, that means they traveled a long way to get here & they just aren't as good as fresh local summer peaches. I had to have a rant when I saw that comment - I wish people would quite trying to throw down a non-existent "southern card" about the way people cook. It's just food!! Thanks for taking the time to comment & thanks again for reading.

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  7. Oh My Goodness Mary, this truly made my mouth water. I love peaches so, especially fresh canned (which I have not had in years) and peach cobbler is my fav, fav, fav......

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  8. Hi, I am another GRITS now living in the Pacific Northwest and I use canned peaches in my peach cobblers all the time. My mossback (and I mean this is a loving way) neighbors thought they had died and gone to heaven the first time they tried it. We get together with the neighbors on our street two or three times a year and they all want to know which dishes I brought. It isn't that I am all that great (well, they do called me Paula) it is just that Southern cooking is so much better than anything else. Never any left overs to bring home.
    I love your blog and enjoying trying the recipes.

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  9. Thanks Sylvia! I totally get that - people rag us southerners about our bacon and our butter, but they sure devour it all given the opportunity don't they? :)

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  10. I LOVE using the batter method. Around 2 years ago I stopped fiddling with the pastry crust and went to the batter and it just makes the dish so much more comforting. Something about the cakiness of the crust and ice cream is just heaven!!!!

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  11. Oh I love them all, but this way is dreamy for sure!

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  12. The best peaches aren't from Georgia OR North Carolina, but come from Chilton County, Alabama... Just for future reference..

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    Replies
    1. Oh I'm sure there'd be quite a bit of argument over who has the best peaches. All of y'all could send me some from each area though and I'll be happy to do a blind taste test!! ;)

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  13. Actually a lot of the NC & GA peaches died in a blight and their trees were replaced with Red Havens from Michigan, home of the World's best peaches bar none (and I grew up on NC & GA peaches).

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    Replies
    1. I think the best tasting peach is a local peach myself! Your Michigan peaches would have to be picked very early and travel quite a distance for me, so my experience would likely be quite different than yours.

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  14. Mary, I made this tonight and served it with homemade vanilla ice cream....Yum, Yum, Yum....my family at the entire cobbler! It was truly delightful. So good. Thanks again for another Southern classic!

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  15. How far in advance can I make this for it to still taste fresh?

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    1. I've not made this ahead Jasmine, but I imagine that you could do most of the prep work a day ahead if that helps - just don't assemble it until just before you're ready to bake. In other words, combine the dry ingredients by the steps and the peaches and put everything into separate containers. Just be sure to toss the peaches with lemon juice to help decrease oxidation. Then when you're ready to make it, combine according to the recipe. I'm not sure how it would work out as far as quality though since I've only ever made this fresh! I wouldn't try to go any further than the day before for sure. Let us know if you try it!

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  16. My mother in law, rest her soul, always used canned peaches. A good fresh peach is hard to find in Ohio. But her batter was the same. I am not big on desserts but she could always get me to eat this! After seeing the receipe I think I need to suprise my husband with this. Thanks Mary.

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    1. Can you believe some of the silliness folks fuss about?!! I think canned peaches make a fine cobbler myself. Hope that you enjoy the recipe Yulanda!

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  17. Mary, What about frozen peaches? Do you thaw them out first? :)

    Thank you!

    -Trista

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    Replies
    1. Hey Trista! Yes, I would let them thaw first in a colander to let any excess condensation fall away, then toss with the sugar and go forward with the rest of the recipe.

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  18. I made this tonight and wow was it delicious. This is actually my second time to make it. Just as good as the first time. Thanks again for sharing Mary. I love your recipes. Bettie Germantown, TN

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  19. I love cobbler and of course White Peaches are the ultimate if you can get them.
    The only difference between your cobbler and my crisp is the milk. I mix the flour, sugar, zest and egg with 3T of soft butter until it's the consistency of cornmeal....then I drop it on the fruit mix. I then pour the 1/3c butter over it. The crispiness of this topping is fab too. Just thought I'd share. Just got 20 lbs of white peaches put up on Friday. My house just smelled like heaven all weekend. YUM.
    Hope you have a wonderful week, your buddy Oma Linda

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  20. How do we contact you if we need too ask a quick question on some cooking tips

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    Replies
    1. Hi Willy! You can leave questions on the posts in comments like the, or you can post a question to me on Facebook, or you can email me, though my mailbox stays so full, I miss some of those for awhile because they get lost!

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  21. what is lemon zest

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    Replies
    1. It is the peel, or the outside skin of the lemon and is where the essential oils of the lemon are. You use a microplane zester or a fine grater to remove it, but take care to only scrape along the yellow skin and not the white pith underneath as that will be bitter. The zest of the lemon adds a more intense lemon flavor to where you are using it. Always zest first, then juice your lemon!

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