Wednesday, April 14, 2010

Fried Cornbread - Southern Cornmeal Hoe Cakes

A classic southern recipe, cornmeal hoecakes are little pan fried cornmeal medallions that are at home as breakfast, as much as they are as a side dish with a mess o' greens, and just about anything else!

Fried Cornbread - Southern Cornmeal Hoecakes

Fried cornbread, is also known as cornmeal hoe cakes and corn cakes, and sometimes Johnnycakes, is a sort of fried cornmeal flatbread - kind of like if you took cornbread batter and skillet fried it like a pancake. The inside puffs up like cornbread, while the outside gets nice and crispy from frying it in the oil. It's the perfect companion to a mess o'greens, or for breakfast or as a sweet treat when drizzled with a bit of syrup.

I have read that hoecakes likely started with Native Americans who apparently cooked these on hot rocks inside an open fire. The method was later adapted by cooking the bread on the blade of a hoe, and that is how it got its name, though some folks dispute that.

This was a reader request from one of our Facebook family members Sarah, and since The Cajun brought me home a literal armload of collard greens, I thought I would bump up the request since I clearly had greens in my near future ... and everybody knows, you gotta have either cornbread or else some hoecakes to go with! Course these little hoecakes are pretty good all on their own too.

{Southern Hissy Fit Warning} One thing I have learned since blogging and getting to meet and talk with folks from all over the south is that when it comes to cooking and recipes, there is no one south. You will have some stodgy southerners who want to insist that the way they grew up is the only way things are done. Makes me crazy! It's just not true y'all.

The way you learned receipts (recipes) and how to cook, likely came from your mama and was influenced by the way she learned from her mama. Regional aspects also have to be considered because I've noticed that folks here on the Coast cook a whole lot different from, say, folks in north Alabama. We are in close proximity to south Louisiana and our cooking is heavily influenced by Creole and Cajun cooking. We also have an abundant supply of fresh seafood here, so our diets are heavy in fresh Gulf seafood. That ain't happening in north Alabama.

Texans cook far different from Mississippians as do the folks of the Appalachian Mountain region. The coast of Georgia cooks a good bit different from the Gulf Coast. So, there is no one south y'all, but it's all good, so how about let's just stop arguing about what we think is right or wrong about our southern foods and cooking, embrace our differences, eat and enjoy fellowship! {soapbox tucked away}

Now that said... cornmeal hoe cakes are also not hot water cornbread.

Are they similar? Yes, somewhat. Hot water cornbread in its purest form is simply plain ol' yellow all-purpose cornmeal (not cornmeal mix, not self-rising cornmeal), a pinch of salt, and boiling water. The boiling water is added to the cornmeal which starts the cooking process of the meal. Once the boiling water is mixed in and the mixture is just cool enough to handle, but still very hot, it is hand-formed into a small pone in the palm of the hand, which gives it that classic oval shape it's known for. It's then usually fried in hot oil, though also is added to top of things like greens and steamed.

Hoe cakes, like this recipe, are more like a cornbread batter, that's dropped in a skillet of hot oil in little medallions, similar to pancakes, and fried. Apples and oranges folks!

And while I'm at it, please also understand this isn't a historical page. We aren't trying to recreate recipes from The Great Depression, nearly 90 years ago, where folks had limited supplies of things. This blog is a current blog of my recipes, and this recipe is a modern version of fried cornmeal hoe cakes, an adaptation of Paula Deen's Hoecake recipe, which is a signature feature at her Savannah restaurant that comes to your table like a bread basket does elsewhere.

I think it makes a just perfect vehicle for sopping up some pot likker from a big ole pot of greens, with some pintos or a big bowl of soup, though they make a great bread dish for just about any meal really, especially in the heat of the summer when you want bread but don't want to turn on the oven.

Now... how about let's make some hoe cakes!


The batter can be made up and stored in the fridge for a couple of days, since we all know as those greens set up in the fridge, they don't get nothing but better. Or treat yourself and drizzle a bit of cane, sorghum or maple syrup over one. Yummy. Just look at that crispy loveliness with a drip of syrup on it, would ya?


The sugar is optional. I like it in these, but leave it out if you don't.  Now, if you like and you have a well seasoned cast iron skillet, you can skip the oil or butter to brown them, but you won't get that lovely, crispy outside either, so really, why would you want to do that?

Check out more of my southern favorites on my Pinterest page!



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Yum

Recipe: Fried Cornbread - Southern Cornmeal Hoecakes

©From the Kitchen of Deep South Dish
Prep time: 10 min |Cook time: 20 min | Yield: About 10 (5 servings)

Ingredients:
  • 1 cup of self rising flour
  • 1 cup of all purpose cornmeal
  • 2 teaspoons of baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon of salt
  • 1 tablespoon of sugar, optional
  • 2 eggs
  • 3/4 cup buttermilk
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 1/4 cup of cooking oil (vegetable, canola, melted bacon fat etc.)
  • 1 tablespoon of fat, for frying, or oil combined with a bit of butter
Instructions:

Line a rimmed baking sheet with paper towels and place a rack on top; set aside. In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, cornmeal, baking powder, salt and sugar. Measure out the buttermilk in a liquid measuring cup, and add to that the water and oil; blend well. Add eggs and mix well; combine with dry ingredients. Heat oil and butter in a cast iron skillet over medium to medium high and drop batter by about 1/8 cup measures into the hot skillet to form small medallions.

Fry until brown and crisp, turn and brown the other side. Remove and let drain on rack. Serve immediately with warm syrup for breakfast or as a snack, or dip 'em in a mess o' greens to sop up that pot likker (juice from the greens)!

Variation: When corn is at peak and in-season, add about 1 cup of corn cut and scraped off the cob. You'll need about 1 large ear of corn. Can also make this into a pan hoecake. Add only enough buttermilk to make a stiff batter. You may not need the additional water. Pour into a screaming hot, well greased 8-inch cast iron skillet over medium high heat. Reduce heat and let brown underneath about 10 - 15 minutes. Run a metal egg turner underneath and turn to brown the other side. Can also bake in a well preheated 425 degree F oven for about 15 to 20 minutes (no turning needed).

Tip: If you spray the measuring cup with a bit of non-stick spray before scooping, the batter will slip right out. If you don't happen to have that 1/8 cup measure, just do about 2 tablespoons of batter in one pile and push it around to form a medallion.

Source: http://deepsouthdish.com

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©Deep South Dish
Adapted from a Paula Deen recipe
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Posted by on April 14, 2010

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142 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. While the recipe above sounds terrific, not everyone had all those ingredients on hand years ago. My grandmother, who was raised on a poor tobacco farm in Georgia, passed her simple recipe down to me. Cornmeal cut with flour, salt and water. No measurements...just throw it in a bowl and make it a pancake batter consistency. Fry them in oil. Simple as that!

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    2. Yes exactly it suppose to be simple and this is the way I learned it from my mom

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    3. Yes this is the way my mom taught me to make it very simple and good

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    4. That is the way I learned also, sometimes we would omit the cornmeal and just use flour and water and fry it in butter, we called that fried bread. I taught both of my girls and they cook it. We love it.

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    5. I use self rising cornmeal, egg, a few onion flakes and as much milk as you need to mix them and fry them until they are golden brown. Great with greens, pinto beans and beef soup or potato soup.

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    6. Cut the flour by 1/3 cup..........use bacon grease, instead of canola oil...........and put the sugar in your ice tea. There..........FIFY.

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    7. Hahahaha anonymous... bless your heart. Thanks but I kinda like it the way it's written and I certainly don't need you to "fix it" for ME! How about you fix it for yourself and let the rest of the world do what we like? There.

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    8. Yup!! Bless your heart Anonymous!! Want to share "your" recipes? then by all means please do...just do it somewhere else!! Thanks for sharing your recipe Mary/Deep South Dish.

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    9. I kinda think it's nice to know variations. We may like a different taste. Also interesting to know. LOL. Sometimes we don't or won't have all the ingredients either. Thank you .

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    10. LOL Anna, thank you! I guess I was feeling a lit'l sassy last night I guess. ::blushing::

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    11. I use just self rising corn meal, passed down from my Mother and grandmother. Not everyone had flour or eggs during the depression. It is one of my family's most requested. I also make a hoe cake with just self rising flour, fried. We call both of them fry bread. My grandfather was native American. We were always told this was from the American indians.

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    12. I don't believe my Grandma Dreasher used this many ingredients. I don't think she used anything but corn meal, flour, 1 egg, and a bit of milk (just enough to make the mixture about the same consistency of pancake batter). When she made them for supper, she put scallions in them. I also think I remember she fried them in a cast iron skillet with a touch of little bacon grease from her bacon grease can. Yum Yum, I'll take some...................

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    13. That is true anonymous, but it's not The Great Depression now, nor is this website or this recipe intended to represent that era! This is a modern day version and thankfully, at least for now, we can afford the eggs and flour!!

      aramis101010 it's not "that many" ingredients!! You give 6 ingredients in your description and mine only has a couple more - like salt, water & baking powder since I'm using regular cornmeal instead of self-rising cornmeal, so sounds like we're pretty close after-all!

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    14. What about using cornbread mix

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    15. Yes, this is essentially a "homemade mix" so you could sub in a commercial cornbread mix, but remember that it already contains not only cornmeal, but some flour (maybe not enough) as well as some kind of leavener (again, maybe not enough) to make it rise and usually some sugar, so you'd leave out the first five ingredients in the recipe.

      I don't usually buy the mix so I really can't advise as to the results between using a pre-made mix and a homemade mix as in the recipe above, or how to enhance the mix to match the recipe, since I don't know how much of each ingredient is in the mix. Your results will probably be different from the recipe here, but I'm sure that it will still be good!

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    16. As you wrote, there is no 'right' way to do hoe cakes or any other dish of any cuisine. It's all a matter of preference. For example, you couldn't make me use canola but I do love me some peanut oil. I also, sometimes, used to use white cornmeal for things like this or breading chicken. If you want to put it under some greens, try adding some pepper flakes! Really, touch it up here and there to suit is traditional! Thanks for the basic recipe! Love these things! Now I need a good hush puppy recipe! (used to do business in NOLA and the first port of call was Copeland's for a double order to eat as breakfast for a few days! Loved their hush puppies!)

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    17. Oh, I used to love Copeland's! I lived on the West Bank back a long time ago back in the 80s in an apartment complex near the Copeland's on Manhattan in Harvey so I ate & hung out there fairly regularly. I don't remember if I ever had their hush-puppies though, so have no idea if mine are anywhere near their's, but it sounds like those sure must've been mighty good!

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  2. Although I've heard of hoe cakes, I really didn't know much about them-they look so delicious drizzeled with syup, so now, I gotta make them!

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    1. No syrup. Just spread butter and enjoy.

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    2. I agree just butter and leave out the sugar.

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    3. Oh yes indeed. Try them with syrup, if you're making them for breakfast. Absolutely elicious!

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    4. Try cutting up some okra and adding to the batter...yum

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  3. Thanks for reminding me of these...my mama used to make them but I never do. What's my stinkin' problem?? These look delish!

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  4. I love these little fellers and will have to have some soon. Along side a pile of pulled pork should work well.

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  5. oh i just LOVE hoecakes. i never ate them with greens before but i sure will next time. i just made greens recently. there is nothing else that has quite the texture of a hoecake and i always fry mine in bacon grease!

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    1. Almost anything is better fried in bacon grease!

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  6. My mother used to make these! I loved them. Haven't made them for years and not even sure I still have her recipe for them.
    Copying now and will have them next weekend. We liked them with maple syrup!

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    1. My mom made them as well, I used to a long time ago.
      Will do it now.

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    2. My wife is what called a river rat she turned me on to hoe cakes 30 years ago we call then johnny cakes, with a big glass of buttermilk! MMMM Love your site, makes me think back,but now I have Type 2, so I have to eat low carb! Mr Cajun is a lucky man too!! Love your county girls cooking best in the world!! Thanks again and God Bless

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    3. You're welcome Erik - thanks for such a sweet note.

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    4. Mary:Thank you for your reply. Not to bore you dear,but we started our married live in a tent,building a cabin in woods. after 30 years I can say ,There are no women better than a county girl! Most don,t cook anymore! Mr Cajun and I are blessed!! Bonnie and I love your site!

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  7. I did not need to see this recipe. I don't think it is weight watcher approved. Actually it may not be so bad. Calorie wise?

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  8. Oh so yummy! I'm going to try making them...I'm going to try making all of it!

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  9. You had me at pot likker. Yum! My tummy is growling. My Mama made THE best hoe cakes. You gotta have these with greens and hot sauce. And when tomatoes are fresh off the vine it can't get much better.

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  10. Love these hoe cakes! and Southern food in general!

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  11. Love those Hoe Cakes. I'll be using your recipe with the next batch of greens. Been MIA for a bit and didn't realize how much I missed your blog till I saw these babies!

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  12. "they don't get nothing but better"

    haha! you're so cute, and so very obviously southern!!

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  13. Those would be excellent topped with a little pulled pork and a fried egg! What? I'm serious! Thanks for sharing this, going to use it as a side for my next bbq.

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  14. Hot cakes? i have heard of these but never knew what they were or what they tasted like! thanks for recipe Mary - going to try it out!

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  15. These are soooooo good too if you have some purple hull peas with a big ole slab of tomato on top and a few slivers of onion on top of that. When you finish using your cake for a scooper, then you use it for a sopper. My mouth is watering and I am full as a tick from supper. :-)

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    Replies
    1. Now U're cooking with Crisco!!!!! (Southern saying when someone gets something right,lol)

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    2. Alabama corn meal is all you need

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    3. Yes to Alabama corn meal.

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    4. I love the stone ground cornmeal from North Carolina from one of the Smoky Mountain mills. It's the best cornmeal I've ever used in my life! I don't think I've ever tried any cornmeal from Alabama! Please y'all clarify what brands that you refer to in case somebody might like to try your recommendation. Dixie Lily/China Doll's Alabama King? McEwen & Sons? Pollard?

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  16. I've never made Hoe Cakes, but, I want to now!! I always made "Hot Water Corn Bread"...it's similar. My Mom always made oven corn bread, which is so good, too. I love all the greens...Collard, Turnip, Mustard, Spinach, Kale and etc.
    Thanks for the great blog!!

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    Replies
    1. I make Hot Water Corn Bread too, and can't imagine a big ole pot of greens without some! I like Hoover's Fine Sifted Water Ground Cornmeal for that.

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    2. Hoover's Fine Sifted Water Ground Cornmeal is a great meal with a wonderful texture. If you are in the South check at a locally owned grocery store or grocery chain like Piggly Wiggly for locally or regionally produce cornmeals such as Old Mill at Guilford and Atkinson's (they do super-fine or cattail white cornmeal) in North Carolina.

      In may family (North Florida/South Georgia/Southeast Alabama) we made cold water, fried corn bread. It is as simple as it gets. Fine ground meal (preferably white, but yellow will do), salt to taste, and water. Adjust the water depending on whether you want it thick like a hoe cake or thin, crisp, and lacy. Mix thoroughly with a fork. Use a large tablespoon (not the measuring spoon) a spoon into hot oil (shallow, not deep), and cook until golden. Warning: It is highly addictive and people are know to sneak into the kitchen to steal it before dinner!

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  17. Hi Sharon! Hope that you try them, I think you'll enjoy them. Thanks so much for reading!!

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  18. Love the story about the greens. This year I sent my Momma out for my Thanksgiving Collards figuring she'd come back with a big cellophane bag of them, enough to feed my bunch. She came back with a CRATE!!! Now I am all depressed cuz I cooked them and then some over the holidays and have to settle for canned ones for NYE. :(

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  19. Oh my hubby is a riot, so I wouldn't at all be surprised that even though he won't eat them, if he saw a bargain on a crate, he'd sure bring me a crate LOL!! I have had good success with freezing them after cooking (or blanching) you know, just in case that happens again! And don't you worry over having to used canned either - I'm not sure where you're located but there are several brands of canned that are pretty darned tasty these days. I use those all year long. Happy New Year!!

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  20. Mary can you post a recepie for hot water cornbread?

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    1. I sure will Misha!! I've had it in the hopper for awhile but just haven't gotten it up on the site yet - stay tuned!!

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  21. Mary can you include a recepie for hot water cornbread please! I use to eat it as a child but don't have a good recepie for it....thanks

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    1. I do have one Misha but haven't worked it up for the site yet. The old school version was just regular cornmeal and salt with just enough boiling water to make a thick batter than can be formed into a small patty. I'm not fond of it though - it's a bit too plain for me. I can tell you that many folks today just simply take a cornbread mix - the one that you don't have to add anything to to make cornbread - and just simply add boiling water to that and call it a day, but I'll get my homemade recipe up at some point!

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  22. Just made collards tonight; wish I'd seen your recipe BEFORE dinner!

    I grew up in GA, and in the early 70s when I was about 5th grade a neighbor taught me to make what she called hoecake bread. I remember flour and baking powder, but none of the other ingredients. I don't think it had corn meal like my mother's fried corn bread. A "hoecake" nearly filled the skillet and was sinfully delicious, but I don't remember how to make them. Does this sound familiar to you?

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    1. It sure does LaCharla! Click right here to see my biscuit bread, also called hoecake bread!

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    2. I grew up in Georgia, too. My Mama's version of a true hoecake was with flour, not cornmeal. She called her cornmeal ones fried cornbread pattties. Both of them were great, but the flour one was best for syrup!

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    3. It just all depends on what you grew up and even in the same state, what things are called & how they are made always varied by households, most often influenced by what one grew up with and what their mother grew up with! I love the diversity of recipes across the Southern region & I'm glad we aren't all the same. I call these cornmeal hoecakes. I call the flour ones hoecake bread.

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    4. My mamaw never made greens without making hoe cakes.Miss them both.

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    5. Aw Teresa {{{HUGS}}} I do know what you mean. My mama, daddy and both sets of grandparents have all passed on but when I cook the foods I associate with them, it brings back the memories and it's like they are right in the kitchen with me.

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    6. They were mostly corn meal a little shorting and water cooked over an open fire on the blade of a garden hoe held over the fire.

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    7. And I make mine with onions and jalapeno peppers and sometimes some shoe peg corn.

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    8. I make mine with cheddar cheese, onions, and sometimes jalapenos, too. Awesome !

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  23. Wish I'd seen your recipe BEFORE I finished dinner--which included a big ol' pot of collards! :-D

    When I was in about 5th grade (late 1960s) my neighbor taught me to make her "hoecake bread"--which was a fried bread that covered most of the skillet. I remember flour and baking powder, but not corn meal. (My mother used corn meal for fried corn bread, which had a different texture.) Any chance this sounds like a recipe you've heard of? Or if not, what adjustments would be needed to omit the corn meal from your recipe? I'd like to re-create those "hoecakes."

    Thanks in advance. Glad I discovered your site today.

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  24. IM A CAJUN AND I DONT EAT MAPLE SYRUP. I USE STREENS PURE CANE SYRUP.

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    1. Now Mr. Johnny, had you visited with me a little bit longer, you would have seen that we use plenty of Steen's around here too!! Sometimes I like a little bit of milder flavor though so I haven't a thing against maple syrup, or even pancake syrup. :)

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  25. I just made these and they are really , really good. The best Johnny cake I have ever eaten. My husband kept coming back for more when I was cooking them . The aroma filled the house. My batch made 16 Johnny Cakes.These would be good with anything that goes with cornbread. I like them better than I do cornbread. Yes, I could enjoy a bit of butter and maple syrup on top..Yum..thanks so much for this wonderful recipe.

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  26. Silly question: At what point do you combine the liquid ingredients with the dry ingredients?

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    1. Not a silly question at all & so sorry that wasn't clear! Need to fire that editor I tell ya... oh wait. That's me!! :) Mix the dry ingredients together, mix the wet, then combine.

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  27. I know this post is old but I like mine for breakfast with ketchup and salt. I guess Im weird but I also eat them for supper with greens and some pepper sauce! yummmm

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    1. I remember these when I was a little girl .. My mom would make these and they were soooo good.. When we were kids we would call them corn cakes.Thanks for bring back those memories.. I will be making these tonight.. thanks for sharing.

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  28. I always have Martha White self-rising buttermilk cornmeal mix on hand. Could this be substituted for the meal, flour and baking powder?

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    1. I'm not sure what the ratio of the cornmeal and flour are in the mix but I would think that it would work fine. Let us know!

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    2. Yes it works just fine. I just made some for lunch....I only use the self rising meal, buttermilk and a little bit of water, fry it up in bacon grease. I leave out the eggs and sugar...That is the way we always made it in Eastern KY

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  29. I have a question which is in no way indicative of your recipe. I have always made oven cornbread, but my dad made these growing up, so of course I was thrilled to try your recipe. There is a user issue. I am unsure WHAT I did, but they crumbled in the pan being hard to flip so I waited longer. But then they soaked up all my oil. They taste amazing. But they look significantly different than yours and I am sure oil logged wasn't the plan. Help?

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    1. Hey Allyson! Hmmm... let's see. Did you accidentally use all purpose flour instead of self rising? It's not a problem except with all purpose you'd have to add some leavening so that they bind and rise.

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  30. Allyson, my wife has Celiac disease. Which means I can't cook with regular floor. Have you tried your recipes using rice flour? That's the only flour I can cook or bake with. Thanks ... Gentleman from Missouri.

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    1. I wish I could help but no I haven't. I know that just about every GF recipe book out has a version of baking mix or flour replacement, so I suppose with some adaptation you could certainly do something similar!

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  31. We recently purchased a restaurant and are featuring a New Years Day meal. Pork Chop, fresh local collards, dried black eye Peas, hoe cake and sliced tomatoes. Thank you for sharing this great recipe Mary!

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    1. You are so welcome - that menu sounds perfect!

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  32. I made tonight and had with some leftover greens. AMAZING!!!

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  33. I love these! I am from pascagoula :) we are basically neighbors!

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  34. Oh my gosh! I just found your site this morning when I befriended you. It brings back so many memories. I grew up in a southern family who are all gone now. I'm not fond of collards or turnip greens and couldn't eat them now if I was because of blood thinners. I will be 80' tomorrow and finding this today made my birthday weekend special. We are celebrating with family tonight so I just might have to make these for myself tomorrow. My husband of 58 years wouldn't touch them. I suppose I could put candles on them since it's my birthday. Your writing is great. Don't let anyone tell you different.

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  35. Hi Patricia! I first want to say Happy 80th Birthday! Welcome to my website and I hope that your visits will bring happy memories. Make those hoecakes and celebrate. Happy Birthday!!

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  36. My mom has cooked these as far back as I can remember. Have them with a pot of lime beans cooked with a hamhock. UNBELIEVABLE DELICIOUS

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  37. My grandmother would sprinkle some cornmeal into the grease (mostly vegetable oil with added bacon grease) and allow it to heat together until the grease was hot enough to drop the mixture in to fry. This allowed some tasty "grit" to form on the outside of the cakes. She would add more meal between batches for an ongoing gritty crust. It is amazing! I've found that adding 1/2 tsp each of onion powder and garlic powder adds a little more flavor. This is a must to serve with white beans and ham hock.

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  38. We call them corn cakes, delicious

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  39. Can you just make them with self riding cornmeal and omit the baking powder etc.

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    1. Certainly! Just make sure that it is fresh. If it's old the leavening can go stale.

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  40. Our mama was 5th generation Florida Cracker and both our parents had roots in Georgia and S. Carolina. Plenty of 'southern' in that mix!
    Anyway, mama used to make these and also what she called 'corn dodgers'. Similar mixture, but she would form it into 'pones' and lay on top of her simmering greens to cook. They came out green and infused with pot likker (just like you said!) and were loved by her family.

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  41. My folks were generational Southerners, going back to the 1700's. Mama made these often. When cooking greens, she would form them into pones and lay them on top of greens - collards, turnips, mustard - while they cooked and the pones would steam and be infused with the pot likker.

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  42. My Granny always made them and we tore them up. Her recipe was so much easier and they tasted the same just thinner and crispier. So I thought I would share. Only two ingredients needed

    1 cup of Self Rising Corn Meal
    Buttermilk I start with a 1/2 cup and then eyeball the consistency not too thin but not too thick

    Mix together let sit for a few minutes till you see the batter rise then remix

    In a skillet heat your grease in the pan then ladle tbsp fills in
    Brown on each side and then place on paper towels and eat them up!!!! Collards were her choice of greens and mine as well but my kids love them with black eyed peas and so many more veggies. We could seriously eat them with any meal.

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    1. Yes they are delicious aren't they Jessica, and so versatile! The recipe above is certainly not difficult, however, your 2-ingredient recipe of only self-rising cornmeal and milk or buttermilk is actually not what I would consider to be the same as the above recipe, which I hope that you will try sometime to compare to your two ingredient recipe.

      I don't keep self-rising cornmeal in my pantry, because I use all-purpose cornmeal in my cooking, which accounts for some of the additional ingredients for leavening. The other added ingredients here make a difference in both flavor and texture of the finished hoecake, setting it apart from just cornmeal and milk. Thanks so much for sharing your shortcut version, though I hope someday you'll try this one as well to see the differences between the two!

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    2. We call it Hot Water Corn Bread because we use Boiling Hot Water it cooks the Meal so all you have to do is Brown by Frying. We call left over Biscuit Doe and make 1 big Biscuit called Hoecake.I always wanted the Hoecake.

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  43. take this same recipe and add about cup cut fresh or frozen okra or your choose of cut vegetable good eating


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  44. We call it Hot water cornbread.

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    1. A little different from hot water cornbread which is usually just cornmeal and hot water! This is more like a cornbread batter that's dropped in a skillet in little medallions like pancakes and fried.

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  45. I grew up eating these. My grandma would fry them in bacon grease with maple syrup. So delicious, not very healthy. :)

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    1. Oh yes so good but we don't eat them all time that way so I guess all things in moderation, right?!

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    2. HOE CAKES ARE VERY DELICIOUS WHEN YOU MAKE THEM RIGHT!!!MY MAMA MADE THEM WHEN I WAS LITTLE AND I'VE MADE THEM FOR MY FAMILY EVERYSINCE I MARRIED. ALTHOUGH ALL OF MY CHILDREN ARE GROWN, I STILL COOK THEM BECAUSE THEY'RE GOOD WITH ANY GREENS COLLARDS,MUSTARD, TURNIPS, RUTABAGAS (CALLED THE NORTHERN TURNIPS)...ETC. THEY'RE GOOD WITH SORGUM SYRUP AS YOU SAID, ALSO WITH BLACKEYED PEAS, FIELD PEAS, CROWDER PEAS, LIMA BEANS, BUTTER BEANS....AND THE LIST GOES ON!!!

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  46. They look very much like our pancakes. Very tasty with any jam.

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    1. They are pretty much like a cornmeal pancake!

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  47. "Fried Cornbread - Southern Cornmeal Hoecakes" are simply known as Hot Water Cornbread. You also only need oil, cornmeal, salt, sugar, and hot water to make these. Add whatever else you want for different flavors but the actual cornbread is very simple to make and doesn't require all of these ingredients. I'll definitely try this recipe out though to compare to what my family and I have been eating in southern states for MANY years. This will be interesting.

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    1. Well okay Siarrah! Just for the record, this recipe is NOT for hot water cornbread, so the comparison is apples and oranges. I hope you enjoy trying cornmeal hoecakes for a change, but they aren't your hot water cornbread! Actually, because of the additional ingredients, I think their better!

      Hot water cornbread is made several different ways - it all depends on what part of the south you grew up in and how your mama did it. We all do things a little different from one another in the south. That doesn't make my way or your way is more right or wrong - just a little different and what I am accustomed to.

      In it's purest form, hot water cornbread is simply yellow cornmeal, a pinch of salt and boiling water - even less ingredients than yours! Once the boiling water is mixed in and the mixture is just cool enough to handle but still very hot, it is hand formed into a small pone in the palm, then fried. That's the way it's done around here.

      I hope that clarifies the differences and thanks so much for stopping by!

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  48. I make these all the time, though my recipe is a little different. My grandmother called them corn cakes.

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    1. Yes, they are also known as corn cakes. What is different in your recipe? Please share!

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  49. I have so enjoyed and admired the unhurried and detailed explanations in your writing. Your tolerant ease.

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    1. Thank you Sandra! I'm a fairly sensitive person, but since I started blogging I've had to grow a slightly thicker skin. :)

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  50. Mary, A split piece of bacon over each cake, and then a fried egg over each and then covered with syrup. Epic!
    I’ve actually found a local version of Steen’s. I’d never had it before. But now it’s on my pantry list.
    Thank you.
    God bless.

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    1. Yes indeed! Glad you found some cane syrup too Chris!

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  51. Wait, you can still get sorghum? Where? My Dad's family is from Benton County, Tennessee, so it was a big part of my childhood.

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    1. Oh yes, definitely! I've bought it right off the shelf at my local grocery store, but it's available from various resources online and even at Amazon! I found this one from Muddy Pond, Tennessee right there, but there are other brands, as well as sources across the web.

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  52. Made these and have been enjoying them with Karo syrup like my big mama did, & with kale, garlic & seitan fried with bacon grease for the urban foodie I've become. Sharing them for my son's international day. Should I refrigerate them overnight or leave them out & reheat? Thanks for the recipe!

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    1. Either way. You're good on the counter for a day but after that, definitely refrigerate!

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  53. Delicious. All you need is a hoecake or two and a cold glass of sweet tea.

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  54. Love how cakes,as with most on here was taught simple ,cornmeal water diced onion n little sugar last night I added squash to mine n they were awesome

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  55. Ive been looking for a way to wake a cornbread sandwich rrol to setve bbq pulled pork on. Would these hold together for that purpose?

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    1. Hi Lynne! These are a bit sturdier than regular cornbread for sure. I'd make the batch a little thicker using less liquid, but also would suggest that you use either lightly sauced or even unsauced pork on the sandwiches with a squirt bottle of sauce on the side. Too wet and they will definitely not hold up!

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  56. I add diced onion & jalepeno

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  57. You can also add corn to the batter.

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    1. You sure can and in fact, it's in the variation of the recipe text!

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  58. That is the only way to fix cornbread. It is excellent with pinto beans, potato soup, turnip greens, and deviled eggs. Mighty fine eating.

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  59. That is the only way to fix cornbread. It is excellent with pinto beans, potato soup, turnip greens, and deviled eggs. Mighty fine eating.

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  60. OED agrees with hoe blade story. Reported as early as 1774.

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  61. I enjoyed the read as much as the recipe.

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  62. I should add my nieces go crazy if I add bacon bits or better yet cracklins to these. You've got some new fans for sure!

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